Randle El makes College Football Hall of Fame ballot

Former Indiana quarterback Antwaan Randle El is included on the 2018 ballot for induction to the College Football Hall of Fame, the National Football Foundation announced Thursday.

Randle El was the first player in NCAA history to score 40 touchdowns (45) and throw for 40 touchdowns (42), the first to post more than 2,500 total yards in four seasons and the first to both pass for more than 6,000 yards and rush for more than 3,000 yards.

A former Big Ten MVP and first team All-American in 2001, Randle El finished sixth in the Heisman Trophy voting after his senior season. He also earned All-Big Ten honors in 1999, 2000 and 2001 after being selected as the league’s Freshman of the Year in 1998.

Randle El is one of 75 players and six coaches from the Football Bowl Subdivision included on the ballot. Also included are 98 players and 31 coaches from the divisional ranks.

The 2018 class will be announced on Monday, Jan. 8, 2018.

44 comments

  1. A true competitor team leader. I never heard him complain even though he got beat up play after play and game after game. Teams keyed on him and he would run and run. Even though he could pass and run the option with Williams when I watched him play and as the game wore on and teams adjusted I would watch Randle El wear down. By about the middle of third quarter he would be trying hard but actually was not nearly as effective as earlier in game and basically was trying to survive another day. As such goes with IU football.

  2. An extraordinary player. They tried to play him at wide out his senior early to boost his pro prospects but they simply needed him at quarterback.

  3. Yes, against N.C. State and it was a disaster because lack of another QB option. R.E. was a star in pros and super bowl game.

  4. Finally another football article where we have an opportunity to post! Randel El was a great one and I hope he makes it into the college Hall of Fame.

    On another note, is anyone getting concerned about Coach Allen’s first recruiting class. We had a de-commit and are down to 3, with no commitments in two months. I would think we are currently at the bottom of the conference in numbers. The new Minny coach is doing great, and Northwestern and Iowa are getting their share, but we seem to be stuck in 1st gear. Thoughts?

  5. There’s no way to evaluate these things without the final result. Even then, two years down the road everything may look completely different.

    Evaluating recruits sells magazines (or their equivalents). I’ve known kids I didn’t think had a chance (rural NC school) become starters at Notre Dame.

    I just can’t tell.

  6. If “fun to watch” is a factor in the voting formula, Antwan should be a shoo-in. Also, the only wide receiver in history to throw a TD pass in a Super Bowl.

  7. Yes, there are flaws or some unpredictability evaluating recruits as far as how good they are going to be in the future. However, that is a typical erroneous IU football recruiting statement. You have to play the percentages. Percentage wise those that have the higher level recruits are going to be more successful and win more games unless a coaching staff is in disarray. I understand that there are maybe an exception here and there but it is a percentage analysis.

  8. Randle El was an outstanding football player and almost always the best player on the field, no matter who IU was playing. Too bad he did not have enough talent surrounding him or a coach that could spell defense.

    As for Allen’s recruiting class, it’s way too early to be concerned. However, given that Allen has no history as a head coach and is hardly recognized throughout the Midwest (let alone the country), he’s got to produce a winning season in 2017 in order to improve recruiting. That may not be fair to him, but there’s as much upside as there is downside in the circumstances of his promotion to head coach. I like him, I like his style and philosophy, and I believe he will lead IU Football to a break through, but a lot will depend on how his team does in 2017.

      1. …absolutely the best I ever saw who did not but should have WON the HT…also a role model for every kid that earns a scholarship to college and then makes it to the NFL…

  9. Randle-el was the guy on campus when I was there for 3 of my years. He was an absolute joy to watch and a great guy too.

    My favorite highlight was when we were playing at home vs Illinois. Indiana was down 28-7 in the third-quarter. A number of my friends left to hit the tailgates. Another terrible defensive performance, but shockingly, our offense was stagnant. Then Antwaan took his team on his back and carried them. The ended up beating Illinois 34-31 in overtime, second largest comeback in school history.

    I lost count of all the perfect strikes that he threw that went right through the hands of his receivers. We’re lucky that we got to experience him for 4 years. He deserved a better team.

    1. Can’t imagine walking out of a game with Antwaan at quarterback. It would be like walking out with MJ or LeBron playing.

      1. It’s IU Football. Force of habit. I don’t blame folks. The frustration of watching vomit-inducing football for decades has created some habitual grooves.

        Still, I never missed a single game or minute that Antwaan played. Still can’t believe that they couldn’t get to 6 wins with him. Hell, they had Adewale Ogunleye, who started for a decade in the NFL so it isn’t like they didn’t have talent.

        Oh Cam. This is why you aren’t head football coach material. Speaking of which, he’s not employed right now, is he? Out with Les Miles?

  10. A great college player that turned into an excellent NFL player. He should be in the HOF and if he doesn’t make it this year I have to wonder how good he needed to be in college to qualify.

    Recruiting for 2018 is about working to get better recruits before going after the recruits IU has been getting the past couple of years. IU’s recruiting is be based on how well the team does this season with our new coaches. If IU has a breakthrough year we will get the better recruits.

  11. Knowing what he does about the game, Randle El can easily justify dropping the sport at the high school level because of the liability alone.
    That his body has begun to betray him before his 40th birthday is hard to fathom. The crazy thing is that Randle El can feel his mind slipping, too.

    “I ask my wife things over and over again, and she’s like, ‘I just told you that,’ ” Randle El said. “I’ll ask her three times the night before and get up in the morning and forget. Stuff like that. I try to chalk it up as I’m busy, I’m doing a lot, but I have to be on my knees praying about it, asking God to allow me to not have these issues and live a long life. I want to see my kids raised up. I want to see my grandkids.”
    […………..]
    “The kids are getting bigger and faster, so the concussions, the severe spinal cord injuries, are only going to get worse,” he said. “It’s a tough pill to swallow because I love the game of football. But I tell parents, you can have the right helmet, the perfect pads on, and still end up with a paraplegic kid.

    “There’s no correcting it. There’s no helmet that’s going to correct it. There’s no teaching that’s going to correct it. It just comes down to it’s a physically violent game. Football players are in a car wreck every week.”(courtesy: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)

    When he says there’s “no teaching that’s going to correct it,” I assume that would include jujitsu…and other bogus claims to stem the tide of what will be more unveiling of irreversible brain truama. The growing evidence/numbers of players witnessing their cognitive ability slipping away before the age of forty shouldn’t be treated as some sort of freakish anomaly.

    I’m sure he’d be proud of a College HOA induction….I’m even more sure that he’d love to have his health and the full capacity of his mind to enjoy his kids….and future grandkids.

    1. Let’s continue to nerf the world. Take all the risk out of it.

      This issue isn’t cut and dried. And Antwaan is wrong. He’s not a doctor, engineer, or scientist. I’d guess that Antwaan wasn’t aware of the techniques that are changing head injuries. But his concern for player safety (not just his own), is really important. Pressure from former players is important to resist and redirect the inertia that drove the sport for far too long.

      I’m not advocating for status quo. But you’re doing nothing but pointing to the obvious and making a value judgement. Head trauma is very very real in football. But there have been gains made in the treatment and in its prevention. In typical fashion, you laugh at the training jiu-jistu inspired techniques, but the University of Washington, who won 12 games last year, dramatically improved the number of concussions related to football. They are safer and they’re winning. Also, they are investing in new helmets this year (story below–interesting stuff).

      There’s no silver bullet, but things are changing for the better of player safety and the sport as a whole. And it will continue. The results are in and we are just scratching the surface.

      http://www.seattletimes.com/sports/uw-husky-football/uw-huskies-hope-to-improve-player-safety-as-one-of-the-first-team-to-wear-state-of-the-art-helmet/

        1. Are you accusing Randle El of whining about his symptoms? His concerns have no validity because of some jujitsu witchdoctor at Univ. of Washington?
          Hope the ethics a Washington’s major state university don’t model their favorite coach of their NFL team. That man would buy anyone off for a victory….Some will buy anyone off for favorable results in a clinical “medical” study,
          Yes, because we all know the dollars in college and NFL football would serve them to be just as forthright and honest/ethical as a pharmaceutical company pumping pills to cure Swiss cheese on the brain. Now we get those 30 second side effects during their TV commercials….May cause liver failure, blood coming out your ears….skin peeling off in 24 hours….your eyeballs to swallow their pupils.
          Even if the NFL can rocket science jujitsu into helmets faster than Double Down can slam a nerf ball, shouldn’t the NFL and college provide the same sort of warnings to potential permanent side effects to the brain. Why shouldn’t it be stamped as a warning on a college scholarship in the same manner a warning for the potential of lung cancer is stamped on a pack of cigarettes? Oh, go ahead an smoke a pack a day…Wouldn’t want to nerf the world of black lung.

        2. Chet- You whine more than Napa Valley. “I’m going over to the RSS feed.” “My kid taught me a new way to use the feed without seeing his posts….because just the sight of someone challenging my nauseating narcissism burns my tender grapes.”

          1. The statement is not verbatim….You probably didn’t say “tender grapes.” Somebody in your family got you a tablet device….Somebody helped you set this device up so you could filter out certain comments….I don’t use the RSS feed. I don’t even know what it is. I don’t care. Somebody made your life so much more beautiful.

            Why must I always have to a rock to lean on for an opinion? Do you honestly think I’m in the minority when I say I don’t believe jujitsu can be the cure-all for all the damage that can occur in a sport with force levels that could serious brain damage simply based on the mass accumulation of sub-concussive hits?

            Lastly, whenever I “whine” (meaning have issue with a statement or have a debate with someone in your email alliance, you find it necessary to drop insults and snide). I’ve had plenty of agreement with Double Down…But I don’t live in a world where agreements on any topic make an opinion more supreme than another contributor/contributor.

            There’s an arrogance growing here that certain contributors should be seen as final word…(I also sense a continual attempt to reiterate economic status, success in careers, comforts of living in choice climates/scenery, life accomplishments, and various other meaningless demographics as an attempt to give credence to any opinion no stronger than the next guy). There is enormous push-back when the words of these members are not worshiped as more superior/rational/empirical/sound/seasoned than anyone else. It’s very arrogant and despicable form of status bullying/whining.
            Damn, Kyrie Irving believes the world is flat. He’s still loved for it. Why do I need to feel so defensive whether or not jujitsu can solve the problem of coaches putting bounties on the heads of quarterbacks? It appears to me that they not only want to deny brain trauma potential, but they want to sail off the end of the world with and forever make a guy see stars.

      1. Here’s the reality, concussions and their detection can likely be a very hidden thing. What percentage of those who have experienced repeated trauma to the brain will show the immediate symptoms. What percentage could occur near the latter parts of games? What percentage can happen in practices when the athletic treatment isn’t under the watchful eyes of announcers and live cameras?
        Many athletes probably do just about everything they can to avoid getting pulled from a game….or a practice for that matter.
        Also, we had a lot of medical experts surrounding Kevin Wilson. That didn’t stop Kevin Wilson from, allegedly, putting pressure on kids to play. There is no guarantee that those sort of pressures(whether expressed or in some sort of silent world that football players never “nerf” their world) don’t exist at all major football programs.
        The science is far from in. The evidence of the destruction to brain tissue is only beginning to scratch the surface because the small percentages examined. The true numbers in 10-20 years could be staggering.
        Dollars fueling the industry are as protected as a Bernie Madoff securities firm.

        Jujitsu cures are the stuff of a charlatan trying to make a buck. It might as well be snake oil. The name of the game in football is to knock the guy’s skull out of his helmet …..Just ask Sean Payton.

        We are witnessing more and more high profile NFL players walk away from the game early. The slow drip of addressing and detecting…along with the risks of irreversible brain trauma remains the most salient reason many of the stars of the game are hanging up the cleats early. Unfortunately, nerves ain’t muscle tissue/repairable ligaments….nor spongy nerf balls bouncing back good as new. The damage is very difficult to detect and we understand very little regarding the progression of damage once it begins.

  12. Hasn’t this always been the signature of IU Football….? There’s always spotty talent; some of which is unbelievable talent. Haven’t we witnessed some of that in recent years with Tevin Coleman, Jordan Howard, and Cody Latimer? But more often it’s those high profile offensive positions on a team. How often do many of these anomaly standouts on a Hoosier football roster end up in Bloomington because they are simply overlooked by other major programs already three or four deep at said “profile” positions?

    When(if ever) IU begins to see more guys from the trenches and the defensive backfield getting drafted high(one day to be HOF inductees from the defensive of the ball), then you’ll know IU Football is more than a handful of hallmark talents…or a couple of very distant twinkling stars in a historically bleak program.

  13. We also need some future HOF kickers/punters…How many of those close, near breakthrough, games under Wilson did we lose via the toe of a very inconsistent kicking game?

    Don’t many great kickers morph from unheralded geeks in the game of soccer into celebrity NFL kickers? One would think we could utilize such a marvelous soccer program at IU to serve as a bit of window/opportunity to find great kickers for our football team….?

  14. It only takes 0 words to say nothing. Incessant posting is so boring and wastes so much of life.

    1. People who use their time wisely tend to complain less about their life, I’ve noticed.

  15. Football is safe. Humans are generally on the lower order of things…We deny pollution…We don’t care what quality of life future generations inherit as long as we get we want today. We deny climate change…We elect buffoons. Hell, even if we had nearly all certainty that 10 years of combined high level football will cause irreversible brain damage in 75% of participants, it wouldn’t stop a poor kid thirsting for the money …or the shot at improved economic status.
    We are “now thinkers.” We are on the lower order. We are built to survive and thrive. We are built to destroy rather than share. As a species we are a near mirror of everything we love about football(including the dangers and risk). If your hits could cause a guy’s head to pop off like a Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em robot, viewership and participation would increase.
    It might be more dangerous to board an international flight than play some heavy hitting football. I love football. I love the huge hits. If they soften the game and turn tackling into judo, I’ll have no interest in the beautiful play designs and perfect spirals. But will I watch soccer instead? Nope. I can’t watch bumper cars on grass. I want to tune in for the same things as the next guy…I tune in for the “wow hits.” I want it all living on the edge of dirty. I want hits to be slightly softer than one that would include jail time. And believe me, the big brains in NFL boardrooms know what we love. We are of the lower order. I’ll do heroin before watching football jujitsu.

  16. Fantastic. Harv destroys another thread with another lecture on morals while firing shots in all directions. I thought this was supposed to stop last year.

    What a tribute to one of IU’s all time greatest players (in any sport). I’m ashamed for taking the bait. Responsibility taken. I should have known better.

    1. Virtually every thread on the Scoop is killed by Harvey. Just go back and check. Once he begins his endless, inane posting you know the thread will soon die. Intelligent discourse becomes impossible.

      Harvey the Thread Killer.

  17. What it destroyed was the stubbornness of your arrogance and “last word” opinion…due to my quoting Randle El’s honest feelings regarding the dangers, and his own fears, of ending up permanently destroyed of cognitive health because of football.
    One of the best football players in IU’s history has admitted to a reluctance in encouraging his own kids to play the sport. I’ll let you ask him if better helmets or a jujitsu seminar would change his opinion…..

    1. Stupid, incessantly, silly BS. The mud he throws never remains in a vertical position. Always in a slump.

      1. Here…Knock yourself out, Clariyawn
        Get a day’s worth out of the way in one post:

        I am as nervous as a long tail cat in a room full of rocking chairs.
        He’s about as useful as a pogo stick in quicksand.
        You look about as happy as a tick on a fat dog.
        He couldn’t carry a tune in a bucket.
        He’s busier than a one-legged man at a butt kickin’ contest.
        He thinks the sun comes up just to hear him crow.
        He was as mad as a mule chewing on bumblebees!
        You could start an argument in an empty house.
        You look as happy as a dead pig in the sunshine.
        He’d gripe with a ham under each arm.
        Well, don’t you look prettier than a glob of butter melting on a stack of wheat cakes!
        If brains were leather, he wouldn’t have enough to saddle a June bug.
        The engine’s runnin’ but nobody’s driving.
        If his brains were dynamite, he couldn’t blow his nose.
        He’s so dumb; he could throw himself on the ground and miss.
        That boy’s two bricks shy of a full load.
        I think that boy’s about two sandwiches shy of a picnic.
        I think he’s one fry short of a Happy Meal.
        If everything is coming your way, you’re in the wrong lane!
        Excuses are like backsides. Everybody’s got one and they all stink.
        That’s about as useful as a trap door on a canoe.

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