Hoosiers add JUCO lineman Bradberry

Indiana picked up a junior college lineman Sunday in Riverside’s Chris Bradberry.

The 6-foot-6, 280-pounder was originally a San Jose State recruit for the 2017 class. After redshirting at SJSU, he ended up at Riverside Community College in California for two seasons.

That means Bradberry should be a redshirt junior when he joins the Hoosiers this coming season and adds depth at the offensive tackle position. IU was in the hunt for Hampton University grad transfer K.J. Wilson, who committed to Pittsburgh last night.

Of course, Bradberry was making his commitment on Mother’s Day. He wrote “Happy Mother’s Day momma!!! This is for you” on his post to social media.

“It has been a long journey and (my family) have done nothing but support and push me to help me be the best version of myself, and who I am today,” Bradberry wrote. “This has been a long journey, and going the JUCO route was the best option for me.”

He is the second JUCO offensive lineman from California the Hoosiers have brought in this offseason, following midyear enrollee Luke Haggard from Santa Rosa. It’s anticipated that Haggard, who checks in at 6-7, 265 pounds, may redshirt his first season with the Hoosiers as he adds more weight to his frame.

IU needed to reinforce the tackle position following the subtractions of Coy Cronk (grad transfer) and DaVondre Love (graduation) from last year’s team.

Here is a highlight from Bradberry’s 2019 season at Riverside CC:

84 comments

  1. Bradberry is a physical blocker with decent feet. I don’t see how he can have two years eligibility after playing three but supposedly he has two left. It would be nice to have him develop for a year and come back for one more year. I hope our OL is salty enough they don’t really need JC players more than just as solid back up to put in the rotation. It will be interesting to see how the OL performs this season.

  2. He’s only played two years so he has two years remaining. The staff has been actively looking to shore up the line as depth and talent aren’t where they need them to be. This season’s group needs to avoid the injury big as it’s a very thin u it right now, even with this addition.

  3. Either his weight was listed incorrectly or he’s going to be adding some weight this summer. At 6’6″ I assume he’s going to play at 300 lbs. or more.

  4. They’re trying to get him to campus as quickly as possible and, hopefully they’re able to formally get back into the facility by early June. He’s over 300 now. The weight listed is old.

    1. The Indiana 247 guy (Matt Weaver) talked to Bradberry on the phone and Bradberry told him he weighs 285 right now.

  5. So where did the Bradberry family get all that cool IUFB gear? Gotta click and scroll deep into the official IU website to find anything with IUFB on it. Green IU St. Patrick’s Day shirts get more prominent display. GET WITH IT, ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT!!!!!! And while you’re at it, SCHEDULE NOTRE DAME NOW!!!!

  6. I think the only chance of IU playing ND in Football is if we’re fortunate enough to play them in a bowl game. Otherwise, I think you’re going to wait a very long time, if ever, before your demand is met.

    1. I suspect you are right, PO, but I can dream. And apparently I can only dream about buying some cool IUFB shirts, as well.

  7. Our OL must be really weak that we signed a juco 6’6″ 285 lb. tackle who had zero offers out of HS, was a no star, and signed on to San Jose State’s #98th ranked 2017 recruiting class in June of 2017 as a walk on. So after being at SJS for a year, and Riverside CC for two, he tweets that he has 8 offers, including his first FCS offer, the University of Texas at San Antonio. Then we swoop in and steal him away from UTSA! Wow! Of course, we only offered him after Pittsburg stole the grad transfer OT from Hampton our coaches were pursuing.

    I know, I shouldn’t even be posting such truth here, as there are only a few posters left who can find positives in all recruiting news, no matter how dismal. I am just bummed out that our coaching staff has not been able to parlay their 8 win bowl game season into a better recruiting class that currently stands at #57 nationally and #13 in B1G.

    Meanwhile, our Gator Bowl opponent who snatched a 1 point victory out of the jaws of almost certain defeat against us has the #2 class in the country with 21 recruits, including two 5*, seven 4*, and twelve 3*. UT got two more 4* this past weekend and has gotten multiple committments over the past 7 to 10 days. Meanwhile, we lose one of our best to PSU. Pretty much every one else in the B1G continues to add to their classes with the exception of hapless Illinois and good ole Lovie.

    Yeah, UT has a history of being a national power in years past, but the last time they were really good was 1998. In recent years they have struggled with numerous head coaches and have been irrelevant in the SEC. They still have a much bigger fan base than IU, but attendance has been down for several years and only the really big games are sell outs. When IU got the 13 point lead on them at the Gator Bowl late in the 3rd quarter, their fans were streaming to the exits as we IU fans were really whooping it up. Then it all changed in a flash and IU self destructed. The UT fans re-entered the stadium and were there at the end as we IU fans sat in stunned disbelief.

    UT turns their narrow 1 point victory into an 8-5 season and the #2 recruiting class in the country. IU turns their narrow 1 point loss and 8-5 season into the #57 recruiting class! I know, it’s only May, but UT could stop recruiting today and end up top 5 while I seriously doubt IU will rise above 50.
    Just so damn disappointing after all these years!!

  8. Ranger67, nothing you say that I disagree with as I was hoping IU could build a very good class on the 2019 season. I knew it wouldn’t be ranked high due to being a small class but was hoping they could pull in a few more 4 star players this year. IU still has a number of recruits they are working on and this class could prove to be much better as more players commit. It hurt having three of our better recruiters leave IU and it takes time for the new staff to build relationships with players. This class isn’t set yet, in fact IU is just starting on building this class.

    I too wonder about our new OL commit but his film shows he has a physical aspect to his game. There are a number of HS players that are late bloomers and I hope Bradberry is one of those players that turn into very good D1 players.

  9. No doubt this young man does not have the best FB pedigree, but I was reminded yesterday that Justin Herbert was a zero-star rated QB coming out of HS. His primary sports were baseball and basketball. So he only had one offer from an FBS School before a coaching change lead to him getting a last minute offer his home town Oregon Ducks. Then he went on to become the 6th player drafted in last month’s NFL Draft. So you just never know how things turn out. If this kid works harder than he’s ever worked before and adds 20 lbs. of muscle to his frame, he may turn out to be a good Big Ten lineman. He’s got the height and the chronological maturity to do it. I just hope he has the sense of urgency.

    As for recruiting after a winning season, the cycle of the process is too long to produce instant results. The recruiting rewards for last season’s success should arrive in the Class of 2021. If we don’t see a significant bump for the class of 2021, then I’ll share Ranger 67’s concerns and disappointment.

    1. Moving the goalposts on when recruiting will turn to more favorable results doesn’t change the issues of why we continue to underachieve on that front.

  10. Ranger 67, you saved me a lot of writing. Pretty much my thoughts exactly. Not only this recruit, (after targeted recruit goes to Pitt…really? and he probably wasn’t the best either) or this year but it reflects tradition and recruiting year after year. Overall, IU football has always had to many mid major college football players trying to play in the big ten east. The results speak for themselves. It also speaks to last years season and maybe this coming season will be the pinnacle for IU football and then go into reload or rebuild. That’s why when IU gets a 3 star recruit the high hopes are often over exaggerated. So recruiting may have improved a little but not enough.
    This brings another question? Are recruiting rating systems or rankings like they were 20 or 30+ years ago or longer when comparing players? Overall, players are better everywhere but when compared IU football is not really getting any better players comparatively speaking than they ever did to much a degree of sustainability. Oh well, on second thought Ranger, you didn’t save me a lot of writing.

    1. You should probably just stick to the women’s BB section of scoop. IUFB hasn’t had this talented of roster in the last 30 years, if ever.

  11. Po. One player and one example. Yes, there are others as well. Plus competent coaching along with player effort and development are needed. However, it’s a simple percentage math problem just like Vegas odds making the house the overall winner and the gambler the overall loser.

  12. The concerns about recruiting and especially with this class aren’t big issues until we see the results on the field. IU is developing a better roster and we have many players good enough for the B1G East despite where they were rated.

    Our defense was young last year and wore down as the season went along but came back strong against TN until the final 4 minutes. Defense kept us in the game when the offense couldn’t move the ball the first half. With more experience and the addition of a couple very good players to the mix the defense could become very good this next season.

    I don’t know if IU will ever be a place where top rated players come to play but IU can hit on a number of players that are outstanding football players.

  13. Are we still fixated on the recruiting overall rankings???

    How many times do we have to be told the number to look at when judging a recruiting class is the Average Player Rating. If IUFB’s current APR holds to the end of the 2021 recruiting cycle, TA will have smashed his own record again! Every year since TA took over his recruiting APR numbers have been higher than any of his predecessors. Right now the APR is at 3.2 which ties IUFB with Wisky for the 5th best rating in the B1G.

    I agree that the ultimate proof of how well the recruiting has gone will be found on the field in a couple years. However, this fixation on where the overall class ranks is ridiculous, and shows a lack of understanding how a recruiting class should be judged. The overall class ranks are highly determined by the number of recruits needed. I could have the #20 rated class and have an average 2.75 on 30 recruits, or I had the #50 class with an average of 3.25 on 15 recruits. Guess which recruiting class is significantly more talented?

    If TA can hold the 3.20 rating to the end of the 2021 recruiting cycle, which means getting them signed, it will be a continuance of IUFB’s outstanding recruiting work under Tom Allen. When you consider that IUFB historically ran in the 2.75 range, a 3.2 final score represents a quantum leap in IUFB recruiting quality. Keep in mind the blueblood FB schools normally wrap up in the 3.75 to 4.0 range with an occasional 4.0 + year. The December first signing period is still 7 months away, but if TA and staff can continue their recruiting at this level, 2021 will be IUFB’s best class ever by nearly a quarter point, and a continued closing of the gap with the elite B1G programs.

    1. The issue continues to be that we aren’t really gaining ground on our conference competitors, since classes have regularly been ranked 10th or 11th based on both volume and ratings of individual players. Some here claimed that the fruits of the bowl season would definitely pay recruiting dividends in the next class, so we’ll see if they’re right. And on the field is where it matters most, with a concern that Maryland, Rutgers and MSU all have staffs known for their recruiting prowess, while we don’t. It’s why Florida and the south are so important.

      1. BD,
        In your naysaying haste you missed the entire point of what I said. Looking at the last 3 recruiting classes TA produced a 2.88, 3.05, and 2.95 which represents the best APR in IUFB history. The 3.05 in ’19 was good enough to be #9 in B1G. The number of recruits in a class tends to skew the rankings one way or another. Ideally, TA will be able to get the class sizes normalized into equal sizes soon.

        As for the 2021 recruiting class, if TA can maintain the 3.2 APR, it will represent a .15 jump from the previous best class in IUFB history. When you consider IUFB’s historical APR was between 2.5 and 2.75, it is a major increase. I agree that Florida and the south are extremely important and IUFB does have growing recruiting prowess in those areas. If IUFB is to get to the 3.5 APR plateau, those areas will be important.

        1. I didn’t miss it but only wanted to give it context. Even with the ‘19:ranking you cite, it’s still 5th in the BiG East, so we really aren’t closing any gap. And the likelihood of maintaining the 3.2 ranking is remote, at best. I’m not arguing against our strategy but I do think some fans have greatly overstated the results. And with Maryland and Rutgers already outpacing us, along with Purdue and Minnesota, the challenge gets tougher, not easier.

          1. Yes BD,
            . . . and you can have a top 25 class, and still be 5th in SEC west.

            At this point, I’m not sure I can agree with your assumptions regarding MD, MN, Rutgers, and PU. Albeit MN was the beneficiary (like IUFB), of a very favorable schedule last year, none of the schools have proven to be consistent on the field over an extended period of time. Even with PU’s win over OSU in ’18, their results have been mixed while spending a running ton of money in the process. For TA, if he can maintain the current program trajectory, it would be a minor miracle for the historically worst FB program in D1. With a program historically as bad as IUFB, any incremental improvement should be applauded, not downplayed.

  14. I agree that the top rated players (maybe a couple low 4 stars here and there) will ever come to play football at IU. Recently, it seems Maryland has been an example for not meeting expectations or under achieving with higher rated recruits.

  15. thinkaboutit, you are on the money about average rating grades v. overall grades.

    The NFL draft shows you can’t tell who the best players will be – how many 1st rounders have been bust or just average players while low draft picks have become stars. Recruiting players or rating players from all over the country with different offenses, defenses, and different levels of competition is a crap shoot at best. I like the approach IU is taking on recruiting as you count on the evaluation of some high school coaches to know what you are getting. Some high school coaches are great at knowing what is needed for college while others really have no clue.

    IU’s success will be based more on how many of their players are hits v misses; right now the hits seem to outnumber the misses and continuing that ratio should help IU move up in the B1G.

    1. High school coaches are far from foolproof. You see that when they come through Bloomington for camps and clinics. I recall one who claimed a quarterback from the south was the next great IU signal caller and a favorite of the coaches, even as he was tumbling down the depth chart. If you don’t know who they’re pursuing, who their competition is, and why they think a player is the right fit, you don’t know whether they’ll move up or not. Coaches, more than any other fans, should know this.

  16. 8 wins against teams with losing records…and 5 losses good IU football season for 2019….tempered by 0 wins and 5 losses against teams with winning records.

  17. How important is the ‘Sixth Man’…or the ‘Twelfth Man’ in college sports?
    Will no fans (or a drastically reduced number of fans) hurt the underdog/notorious bottom-feeder to play with elevated emotion to a greater or lesser degree than than the dominant powerhouse teams of college football/basketball?

    Which schools have the greatest ‘rankings’ for the greatest crowds?

    Is IU Football already conditioned to playing without fabulous crowds? Hasn’t IU Football always been dealing with fans distancing themselves from being present (physically & emotionally) from energetic participation taken for granted by the powerhouse programs?
    Will playing in nearly empty stadiums be more of a ‘shock to the system’ for the Michigans, OSUs, Penn States, Alabamas, LSUs, Georgias…of the college football world?

    Will the absence of massive crowds be somewhat of an equalizer nullifying the talent gaps? Will those talent gaps be functioning in a constrained environment without the multiplier/magnifying effect produced by the aura, spectacle and fervor of a sport seemingly dependent/coexistent to the passion bouncing back and forth to the decibel levels coming from the seats?

    Isn’t much of the prestige to play for various dominant/traditional football programs found in the guarantee to play in front of 100,000 fan-packed stadiums full of screaming/face-painted/shirtless/chest-pounding/school colors-wearing maniacs ?

    Personally, I think 2020 presents a year where IU Football will utilize their decades of training and preparation found in finding emotion without fans. And we enter this changed ‘pandemic world’ at an optimal time because our rising talent level will meet the ‘superior’/’elite’ programs as the absence of huge crowds will shock their systems to a far greater degree.

    Lastly, how much our injuries tied to adrenaline? Does the packed stadium and noise levels of a crowd cheering you as if you were gods increase adrenaline levels? Will this be a season of injuries like we’ve never seen in history because the challenges of getting ‘charged up’ without the ’12th Man’ will make every team feel like IU Football?

    If there is a season, I think it plays to our advantage like no other time in history. The brilliant minds here waste much time talking about talent gaps right now. We are also products of our environments. Football games are not played with sharpened pencils thrown across a silent classroom.
    You discount just how important the fans are to the games (high school, college and pro alike).

    For most of the last 50 years the IU Football fan base has been ‘working from home’…..and ‘cheering from home.’ Some of you really smart people were probably ‘studying from home’…(and ‘studying ranking sites from home,’ too). Memorial has lived as a pandemic testing ground. Welcome to our world, Bama and OSU. Show me what you got now. Hoosier Football plays with mutated sort of passion adrenaline….that you simply don’t possess.

  18. Good point. Until NCAA and big ten for example develop a program to sell virtual tickets that fans can purchase with all the sound with graduated sound decibels per graduated ticket prices and fans setting in the multi million dollar video scoreboards cheering for respective teams. First, maybe home teams like IU could develop this concept for advantage IU. However, conferences and NCAA would probably step in and declare open market meaning visitors and home teams equality rule. Tickets would be sold to whoever will buy them visitors and home teams alike.

  19. Good stuff, t….But even with artificial crowd noise, what does it do to the psyche to see thousands of empty seats. Again, Hoosier Football is already prepared for that ‘hit.’ We’ve been 50 years in training for this moment.

    Of course, most Scoopers who are SEC fans could bring their two best inflatable doll friends to a game to help stymie the visual shock . Hell, maybe even a third friend for when davis gets his scheduling Notre Dame wish granted.

  20. To fill the social distancing gaps at PSU’s stadium, Penn State will be promoting the lifelike ‘Inflatable JoePa & Jerry’ dolls. Jerry actually inflates via the inflatable sanitizing wipes container clutched like a football by his left hand.
    Duke basketball is considering an inflatable ‘Zion’ ….attached to a ‘Mr. Shoe Salesman’ doll to fill the gaps at Cameron.

    Time to get inventive ….IU basketball will sell the inflatable set of a crying Dan Dakich who shares a seat next to a frowning Michael Jordan.

    But I digress…

  21. If any of you are interested, I’ve repurposed my candy stripe pajama bottoms. Only one remaining in stock…Bear Down?

    1. Only concern would be the inability to see me laughing at the “Somebody hold me back” comments from another thread.

      1. You provide ample laughter. I was told by a ‘staff member’ ….

        When you say ‘staff member,’ people listen. I tend to giggle at the all-knowing insider.

        1. “Somebody hold me back! Somebody? Please!“ That’s worth a giggle. Almost as funny as the poster who claimed Crean hired Glass.

          I’d better get a bigger mask.

          1. Crean was hired by a staff memberr….lol

            Fred was merely around for 10 years to part the ‘Redneck TC.’

            You’ll get it right eventually, brilliant ‘Tickle Me Elmo’.

          2. I was just laughing at the idiotic notion that Crean hired Glass. It was funny as it was inaccurate. Nobody ever took it seriously, since it was a lie. Now, somebody hold me back!

          3. Well there are far bigger idiotic notions than Crean hiring Fred Glass…The idea of simply hiring Crean to be a basketball coach trumps all things idiotic. And then to keep such incompetency leading to cue card coaching for 10 years? What in the hell did Tom have on Fred to get those extensions?
            No matter how you slice it, Joey Glass’s recommendation remains an ongoing setback Archie is dealing with nearly four years into his coaching contract.
            It’s the caddyshack committee room gift that just keeps on giving. If you’re into cynical laughter, you should have joined me 10 years ago when I foresaw the setback the Fred & Tom show would place upon IU Basketball. Of course, there were a few other than yours truly who refused to be blinded by the divine light.
            All we are doing now is simply witnessing the price of nepotism. The joke is own you, tough guy. I saw the sh__ show coming.

            I join one of the best basketball coach’s in history who also had zero tolerance for cronies and frauds. Do you think it’s any coincidence that ‘The General’ didn’t return until Peach Basket Bozo was ousted and Glass had committed to retire? I suppose you’ll struggle to add up that two plus two equation as well, Mr. Tickle Me Elmo….?

  22. Giant flat screens filled with noisy on screen fans in the bleachers throughout stadiums across the country….or inflatable fans the more expensive ones with speakers (more expensive speakers would be louder plus more expensive for more realistic fan or better looking fan) could fill the stadiums across the country. Paradigm shift opportunity. Anyone want to buy stock in such a company. It would meet safety requirements distancing plus IU could have a sellout every game.

    1. I was just laughing at the ridiculous notion that Crean was responsible for Glass getting hired. It was idiotic and a lie. I definitely need a bigger mask to conceal my laughter over that.

      1. I think I hit the ‘Tickle me Elmo’ nerve. I’m pulling the string in his back and the apologist now giggles. He’s quite the Sesame Street character.

        Here’s what he is…Just another farce. A know-all. A Crean apologist/crony refusing to acknowledge the disaster of the Fred and Tom show.
        You seem to be quite familiar with my postings….You must be using a new name here because there was no ‘Bear Down’ on Scoop when I was pulling the Crean apologists strings long ago.
        I’m sure you are quite familiar with ‘Conference Midwest Elite’….? Did you know Crean formed ‘Conference Midwest Elite’ while hiring Fred? It was in his contract….
        Take a look at ‘Conference Midwest Elite,’ Elmo. It’s no lie. It’s no inference. It’s no conspiracy. It’s a disaster complements of the caddyshack committees. It’s on your giggle string, Tickle Me Elmo insider.

        1. Breaking News:
          Previously sealed “committee room” documents have now confirmed that Tom Crean is Scooby-Doo. 30 million was guaranteed in a box of Scooby Snacks that came as a yummy present via a ‘Mystery Machine’ committee agreement of sorts when Scooby barked for this guy to drive the van.
          “Do you want Fred to drive the van, Scooby?”
          Scooby: “I do, I do…huh-huh.”

          It was never a ‘caddyshack committee.’ Harvard is a liar. The mystery is solved.

          Scooby Dooby Doo, where are you?
          We got some [hiring] work to do now
          Scooby Dooby Doo, where [at Marquette] are you?
          We need some help from you now

          Come on Scooby Doo, I see you
          Pretending you got a sliver [of a coaching clue]
          You’re not fooling me, cuz I can see
          The way [behind cue cards] you shake and shiver

          You know we got a mystery to solve so Scooby Doo be ready for your [podium] act
          Don’t hold back
          And Scooby Doo if you come through you’re gonna have yourself a [30 million dollar] Scooby snack

          Scooby Dooby Doo, here are you
          You’re ready and you’re [Fred] willin’
          We can count on you, [Committee Room] Scooby Doo
          I know we’ll catch that [Jeff Meyer] villain

          1. In an effort to derail this repetitive train before I have to put someone in lockdown, how about your boy Mac McClung at Georgetown, Harv? He’s in the transfer portal.

          2. We better move fast…..Man, I’d be an Archie fan for life if he’d land McClung.
            McClung is the ‘chip on the shoulder’ Hoosier basketball has been lacking for over a decade. He’s a ‘love him or hate him’ sort of guy, but I’m a fan. I think he’s a winner.
            I’m not sure if there is room for him now….Hope he doesn’t end up at Michigan. I see the personality fit working there (probably even more so if Beilein was still the head coach).

            Anyway….Thanks for letting me know.

          3. That’s right, Jeremy! Let’s get McClung done! Would he be eligible this fall? I can’t keep up with all the rule changes on transfers….

          4. All seems beyond peculiar, Jeremy. I was pushing for Archie to go after McClung (months before any of the news of Damezi )….

            I just felt the young man could be lured and the candy stripes would be right up his alley…Kid was sort of a legendary h.s. player yet no major college was pursuing him…Georgetown ended up becoming the only real interested ‘major’ party late in the game. I think Archie would love this kid.
            It almost seems too coincidental….how Anderson’s portal entry is soon followed by McClung. Can you say gentle push?
            I’m beginning to think we’ve already done this deal. (This is me reminding you of how I got Remy done). Did you know I’m an insider? Yup, I’ve never left the inside of my typing box.

  23. I agree that IU had a better than average (for IU) class in 2019 when we actually had four 4* players, at least two of whom redshirted, but tell me why we are in such dire straights with our offensive line that we have to sign two marginal JC college linemen for 2020? A 6’6″, 285 lb. tackle whose best offer prior to IU was UTSA, and a 6’7″, 265 lb. tackle, also a project, do not inspire confidence in our OL recruiting. It would be one thing if these so called “late bloomers” were being recruited by other BCS schools, but they were not. They have been out of HS for 2 or 3 years! They should have bloomed by now!!

    It seems to me that recruits are committing sooner this year due to Covid-19, although I haven’t researched the numbers. I do know the Florida pipeline someone mentioned dried up last year as we had at most one recruit from Florida in the 2020 class and only one so far this year. So much for the benefits of playing a bowl game in Jacksonville!

    I enjoy playing poker and to be a successful poker player one has to know and play the odds. I have a friend who consistently gets more straight flushes by far than any other player, but he is also the biggest loser. Why? Because he plays more hands chasing straight flushes than anyone else, even though the odds of filling his straight flush are astronomical!

    What does poker have to do with football recruiting? The more long shot projects/marginal potential over achievers you recruit and sign, even though occasionally one or two might really pan out, most will not be productive top echelon B1G players. Something is seriously wrong in our OL recruiting the past 3 or 4 years to end up needing these types of players to shore up our depth OL depth. If the staff knew they were facing this depth problem, they never should have allowed Coy Cronk, a team captain and 4 year starter, to defect to Iowa. The left OT position was Coy’s to lose. The staff bungled that one.

    Give me 5*, 4*, or high 3* recruits and I will consistently beat the team with significantly lower rated recruits. Sure, some will prove to be busts, but the odds are in my favor that I will end up with more B1G caliber players who will be able to consistently win the big games.

    I agree the 5 recruits we currently have are decent, but with players committing left and right to other schools, I seriously doubt our average recruit score will be that high at the end of the cycle.

    Harvard, I hate to admit this, but your theory of games without crowds favoring IU is quite interesting and most likely correct!

    1. Well, thank you, Ranger 67….

      I’ve read a certain person on here for quite some time who has driven into our brains how the lack of IU ‘fan support’ is our train to Nowhere Land.
      Oddly, football under the constraints of a pandemic may just suit the ‘Nowhere Land’ team just perfectly.
      Not to mention, Allen is the sort of sideline coach who is built for motivating at the home of zero decibel levels (a.k.a. Pandemic Stadium).

  24. In spite of my previous comments about the importance of recruiting, for both BB and FB, and the time I spend evaluating IU’s recruits, when it gets right down to it, as long as IU FB produces winning seasons, I don’t really care about recruiting class rankings. If IU has the lowest ranked FB recruiting class year in and year out, but produces a winning record season after season, I’ll be a happy Hoosier FB fan. Would I like to witness IU defeat PSU, OSU, MI, etc. once in a while? Of course! But I don’t expect that to happen very often. It’s just not realistic to expect that IU FB can defeat those programs on a regular basis. Relative to IU, those schools have too much money and enjoy far superior fan support and home-game attendance. And that doesn’t even take into account IU FB’s history and legacy of losing.

    I think it’s either going to take years of IU producing winning seasons (including some bowl games) and/or a bunch of very wealthy IU alumni donating a lot of money before IU will be able to ascend to the ranks of the elite Big Ten FB programs. In the meantime, I’d just like to see Memorial Stadium sold out for a few home games every year.

  25. I think every game of the 2020 Hoosier Football season will be a Memorial sellout. If only 15,000 seats max must be sold to ensure appropriate distancing during the pandemic…(and possible resurgence of the pandemic in the fall), I think we’ve got it covered (masks and available seats for purchase).

    And think of how the lines for the restrooms will be much easier/thinner at places like OSU and Michigan’s ‘Big House’ during the pandemic..
    Suddenly Hoosier football fans aren’t alone when experiencing a clear pathway to a bowl….?

  26. Questions:

    Since college athletic department revenues are likely to experience an unprecedented financial hit because of the pandemic, has the idea of paying head coaches $100,000/year instead of 4-6 million been considered? Have any coaches stepped up to relinquish a sizable share (as in most) of their earnings during this crisis?

    Thousands upon thousands in food bank lines…? Empty stadiums? Playing without fans under consideration? Hey, Tom Crean, do you need all of that 30 million you just escaped out of town with?

    Archie? Can you spare a pandemic dime during Miller time?

  27. Wow Harv, that’s two in a row!

    Will be interesting to see if any coaches pony up voluntarily, or will they just wait to see if the universities are forced to cut their outlandish salaries as the TV revenues continue to dry up. There will be no salary cuts at PSU or Rutgers, as they both got somewhere in the neighborhood of 50 million from the government stimulus package (#2 and 3 in the nation). Tell me how they got so much money, but IU and Purdue only got in the neighborhood of 23 million each?

  28. Some interesting ideas about playing with limited fans this coming season H4H. It will be interesting if this happens and see how it impacts games over the season. How much influence do crowds have on team performance? Noise levels will be reduced and games in crunch time should be easier for opposition teams to deal with.

    The big question is how long our society’s memory will be about this virus IE will social distancing be common or will people join crowds again, will people evaluate what is most important in their lives or go back to past behaviors. etc. Incomes for coaches and others is generated by the interest people have in the product they put out. Will people be less interested in sports and more interested in funding care givers for the sick and elderly? I think any changes will be short term [ a year or sooner] and people will go back to the way they lived in the past.

    1. Good points, Ranger and V13….

      I think many are being extremely naive in thinking sports without fans is a worthwhile idea. Of course, I was mostly being facetious concerning how it could help IU Football.

      The pandemic is tragic on all levels….I find it bizarre how the egos of professional athletes and owners sill operate outside of the gratitude for the common man/woman who, generally, make the sporting world go ’round. I also think they are sweating bullets …..as they hold stubborn to “getting back to normal” even if that means without fans. Bizarre and pathetic …at the same time. The pandemic only highlights just how much the elitist mentality in sports has left the fans behind.
      Not only do they have zero desire to ‘pony up’ some of the mega salaries to help those longtime fans now facing the realities of true economic hardship, they throw salt on the wound as if the common fan in the stands adds nothing to their passion to play the games?
      Heck, I wouldn’t be that cold and disrespectful to the importance of fans if every fan was as engaged as Steve Bartman at a Cubs game.

    2. v13 you’ve surmised the near future perfectly. I was out and about on business travel from early yesterday morning till about 9:00 last night. I set down to eat breakfast at 7:05 in a little local cafe about 65 miles from the house. They already had it figured out and working. Employees wore masks, there was designated distance and situational cleaning done automatically. The cashier, who I took to be the owner said they choreographed their duties twice last week. But he also said he foresaw that in 2 weeks they will mostly loosen up except for the cleaning because of their rural location. 61/2 hours later I stopped for lunch at a tavern in a town of around 9-10k and it was as if there had never been a shutdown. It was about 1/2 full and as I’d expect all friends and regulars of the establishment. No doubt each day they’re going to do as they please because no one is going to police it differently. At about 7:10 I met my wife for dinner just on the outside edge of Fort Wayne and people were lined up outside the building and setting in their cars waiting to get in. It’s already opening up big time.

  29. Elites pony up their accumulated money and or wealth is a TOKEN of appreciation. That token seems much to those who don’t have such money and wealth. And when elites do because they have dump truck loads of it they are usually idolized for it. Several elites will get on tv and other media to take part making their contributions as appearances and cheer leading fund raisers. Actual self sacrificing contributions of money and wealth…what one hears are CRICKETS. Rather, often elites talk about their own feelings of hardships in dealing with a crisis as “we are all in this together.”

    1. Wow…..You pretty much nailed it, t. Your last sentence really hit home. I am so damn sick of seeing millionaires and billionaires “sheltered’ in their islands castles blabbering “we’re all in this together.” These are the same people who are the 1-5% owning 95-99% of the total wealth of our country. They have never been in anything “together.” They are greed machines who value their employees less than the nanny and personal chef in their castles….They believe they can empathize with all who are truly without any sustenance because they’ve lost their nannies, servants and chefs momentarily ….”We’re all in this together.” Makes me want to vomit Covid on them. They’ll have their personal chef throw the backyard pony on the grill as a final meal before they’d ever “pony up” any of their wealth.
      These people want everything back to normal because ….who wouldn’t miss their “normal?”

  30. I’ve had Covid 19 and am in the 85% that didn’t have to go to the hospital. It took 3 weeks to get over and wasn’t much fun. But it never got to be life threatening either. Originally, people that the disease might kill 3-5% of those infected. Now it looks like it kills about .3%- about the same as a bad flu year. We also know that the disease has killed more people over the age of 100 then under the age of 42. For the vast majority, this is not a life threatening illness. We should be hyper vigilant for those in nursing homes and people with preexisting conditions like diabetes. But otherwise, I say let people decide if they want to take the risk of attending social events now that we know the true facts.

    1. 123,
      Had been missing you, great to hear that you pulled through with no mishaps. Everything I am seeing looks like the mortality level will be much less than feared. The biggest lesson learned is to shelter the vulnerable and use a little common sense. I think what hurt the most was the lack of clear information on what we were dealing with early on that did the most damage. Our biggest problem in the whole episode has been the rampant fear. I believe a certain President from many years ago said, “The only thing we have to fear, is fear itself.”

    2. Wow…How terribly misinformed. At every “social event” 1 out of 2 fans will be assigned a hitman. We’ll refer to him as Joe Covid. He attaches to your hip. Once you leave the game, Joe Covid will start looking to put a hit on anyone you near who is old or has some sort of bad health issue or an underlying disease that compromises health. Joe is far better at what he does ….It’s not necessarily a numbers game for Joe. Sure Bob Influenza can toss a grenade and create quite the destruction. Joe’s game is secrecy and accuracy. He doesn’t aim to wound. When he aims at those terrible elderly ‘episode’ creators, he aims to kill…and kill rather quickly.

      Joe Covid’s only weakness is that he doesn’t like to work alone. He needs you. He needs an accomplice. He hates to lug around asymptomatic bullets ….Joe hasn’t been getting as many jobs lately. Started running out of accomplices when the gathering and distancing was put in place. But he’s lurking ….He’s waiting. He’s begging for large crowds where you’re are fine with ‘your risk’….His thing is shooting grandmas and grandpas. He just needs your low risk to hide behind/upon.

      Wouldn’t that have been great in the movie ‘Jaws’….? Just send all the ill and elderly into the water. He’ll tire…He’ll get full. And then the beaches and waters are open again for spring break! Yippee!

    3. 123, sorry you had to go through it and were sick for three weeks. My wife had a fright as she got sick with many the symptoms and went to the doctor to get tested for it. We have been quarantined for 3 days while the test results came if clear of the COVID19. I am glad this virus isn’t like the Spanish Flu that killed young healthy adults more than any other ages.

      Stay healthy and enjoy the end of spring and the start of summer in a few weeks.

      1. A large percentage of our 30 – 50 year old triple cheeseburger fast-food gobbling society are not “young healthy adults.” Most of those with compromised immunity (heart disease and diabetes) is due to economic factors and the pushing of fast, easy and cheap food. It’s a crime that those who can’t afford healthy living are expendable (and many of those ‘expendables’ are minorities working in food factories, service sector jobs and living in inner city populations). They don’t do too much ‘farm to table.’ They are doing crap food to empty calories to overweight to sedentary to health complications to insulin to heart disease to pandemic to hospital ventilator to operating table. We should have some compassion and attempt to make their lives better before…during…and after we’re done with any pandemic.

  31. That post wasn’t for you, thinkaboutit.
    Though I do believe there are plenty of mayors of Amity Island when it comes to Covid-19.

    I listened to Mark Parkinson a little while ago…Seems like a voice of reason to me. Testing, testing, testing and more testing until we have a vaccine. And until we have much wider testing (he believes we’re slowly getting there), he doesn’t advise large gatherings. That doesn’t necessarily mean a locked down economy.

    I tend to agree with what I heard from him. I believe it would be beyond irresponsible to encourage or permit large gatherings anytime soon. We need to test more. There is no vaccine and this virus packs a lethal punch at the most vulnerable. Not to mention some of the cases now classified as ‘Pediatric Multi-System Inflammatory Syndrome’ hitting a very small percentage of kids. It’s a very small percentage, but the images of these kids with severe swelling and redness of their skin is heartbreaking. I just don’t know if we have a handle on how/when/if this virus will mutate. There may be more “episodes” ….
    Let’s also consider how most “old fogies” are running the world….The virus is beginning to get dangerously close to our president and to Russia’s president. It’s selectivity could create considerable instability at the highest tiers of government ….
    Massive groups seems a mistake to me….It’s my opinion. We can be smart without being reckless.

  32. There are a number of mutation this virus will go through with most making it less danger. The problem with any virus that is really deadly like Ebola is it kills the host so fast the virus doesn’t have much time to spread outside a small population. So the dangerous of COVID19 should be getting less with the virus left should be less fatal. No way to know for sure but that is what has happened in the less last 5 decades.

    I don’t think testing is going to make a big difference unless our society is willing to quarantine people that are sick. I think that would be something too many people wouldn’t go with. I think the best thing is to protect the people that are in the risk groups and let everyone else make their own decisions on the risk they want to take. People generally will do what is safe will still doing things they value.

  33. We need the testing because there are too many asymptomatic carriers. We need to know the numbers so “risk assessment” can be made more rationally.
    The countries that got ahead early did the testing and the risk assessment early. They have the needed protocol in place if returns/new spikes begin to manifest. Don’t make people take risk without information. And don’t put that risk on the most vulnerable in our society.

  34. Ranger 67- Are you ready? I’m going for the hat-trick. Can I hit the final 3rd goal of agreement and slap one into the Rangers net? Well, I say puck it…Here it goes.

    Since it sounds as if most the mayors of Amity Island want the crowded beaches and swimmers back in the Covid infested waters ASAP, may I offer a final proposition/contingency in opening up arenas and stadiums?

    Let’s close the sky boxes and suites? Here’s my thinking….Many of the movers and shakers of this economy (owners, donors, insiders, big business, commissioners, television CEO’s execs, etc, etc) are in those sky boxes. I’m sure many of these bigwigs are a pretty influential sect in making the decisions to open things up and get sports back to normal…Are you with me so far?

    Well, that’s just fine opening up if, and only if, we condition such reopening upon their risk being the same as everyone else. They don’t get escorts to the games long before the doors/gates open. They wait in line. They don’t get the careful distancing afford by a private trip to the suite. They get a normal seat. They join in standing in ticket lobbies and the hordes of people shoulder to shoulder going through turnstiles…They wait at crowded concession stand lines and in the restroom lines. They sit in the crowd next to V13 who is spitting out “GO HOOSIERS!” as his saliva sprays farther than a Ramsey throw in multiple directions of a 10 ft. radius.

    Those in charge want the risk? Then they become part of the risk. Every owner/commissioner/athletic department head/college president that’s good with risk must partake in the risk. Zero exceptions. I don’t care if you’re old, fat ..health compromised or simply chicken sh__ ugly. Your financial investment and rewards in profits comes at the same risk assessment and investment as every paying common Joe and Jane at the game. Get my drift, Mr. Amity Island mayor?

    Sky boxes closed. Suites closed. No games unless the ‘top brass’ is in the trenches and in the stands….(or in the waters swimming with “Jaws,” if you prefer) because, as it’s been said repeatedly, “WE ARE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER.”

    1. A false narrative and the associated false and disingenuous choices don’t, and never will, make for appropriate policy. Let’s clear the way for level headed thinkers on subjects such as these and the likelihood of sound decisions will increase exponentially. Making everyone have a room below decks, even though they paid for the nicest cabin, doesn’t impact public safety in the least, and it’s easily dismissed.

      1. You’re right…It’s all going to get pumped through the ventilation system anyway. And then there’s the poor slob in charge of bringing the food to the kings and queens in the suites…(a.k.a. personal hot dog deliver service).
        And then there’s the janitor cleaning the private restroom and the custodians preparing the suite/sky box…And then there’s the chauffeurs and so on, and so on…and so on. All potential asymptomatic carriers. Many of which likely already exposed at various other laborious duties and public exposure because they don’t experience the choices of isolation money can afford.

        That sky boxes and suites serves no better than a sneeze shield at a salad bar. Those crocks going into the salad bar have to be filled and that’s where most the germs/bacteria reside.

        At the end of the day…or a lifetime, the space under the earth (or at the bottom of the sea) makes no distinction. There will never be enough lifeboats or upper deck cabins to defeat mortality. The only real false choices and false narratives are those barking of being “in this together” while remaining consumed with still; preserving ways to be perceived as standing above the next man.

        And the “need” for sky boxes and suites dances to the same beat of an erosion of valuing every member of a team. We wonder why teams don’t play together and why players are increasingly disconnected to coaching…..It’s all part of the same disease. Flaunt…Differentiate…Do not value the gifts of a person (a specialty talent on a roster) who may bring talents/values/gumption which can’t be tied to a dollar. It forever becomes an obsession to look down and to condescend.

        And there is no weakness in the human form like condescension. Those who possess it become the failed teachers and the failed parents…and the failed leaders of countries begging for real courage and decency.

  35. If college basketball doesn’t happen this year, can we install huge screens on the outside walls of Skjodt Hall and create the first circular movie drive-in?
    There would be more than ample parking. Obviously, the first showing on opening night will be “Hoosiers”…..The late night show will be “Blue Chips.”
    Intermission will be a very short film which was miraculously found under a stack of cue cards in a Skjodt Hall storage room closet. It had been shelved for eight years. It’s a beautiful short docudrama of sorts called “Hoosier Rising”. You’ll love it. It will get you pumped for Blue Chips.

    Memorial Stadium might also get converted to a drive-in…? The first four weekends of films (sorry, no football games, but plenty of entertainment and kissing in cars ) will involve repeated showings of all the “Mission Impossible” movies. Maybe a lineup of horror (zombie films) and some slapstick heading into winter…? Final movie of the year would be ‘Groundhog Day.’

    We must get inventive.

  36. Anyone in favor of starting an ‘Electric Football League?’ I know I’d watch. Desperate times. We might just beat the Buckeyes on a a vibrating field…..And these ‘Oaken Bucket’ highlights are fantastic!

  37. Has the life expectancy chart/statistics for the U.S. or the world increased or decreased over the last few months? Or does anyone really have or had accurate information and will they ever have accurate information regarding life expectancy? Or what is included in all that expert math and science statistics? Or does it depend if one is talking to a Retirement investor advisor, or evil knievel?

    1. Doubt it has moved. The #’s would not be considered high, the bulk of deaths would be of folks already over 75 and the youth mortality is so small it is nearly immeasurable. At least that’s what I read.

  38. My electric football days paralleled with IU football. I took my undersized electric football players to my neighbor friend’s house down the street for a football showdown. His electric football game and players were bigger than mine. Yes, it was like the OSU Buckeyes playing the IU Hoosiers in a traditional football game.

  39. But were your electric football players faster and in better condition? Or did his bigger machine simply vibrate so hard that they fell over before they could run in circles to gain one inch like Tarik Cohen?

    I just had quite the hilarious visual….Tom Allen on the sideline pretty much acts like every plastic electric football player. “Wait! What is he doing! Why are you going over there! You’re running the wrong way!….Oops! You tumbled over! Timeout! I can help…Let me stand you back up. He’s vibrating out of his own skin! I’m getting distracted and we just scored a touch down! …Do we have a kicker? Where’s the kicker? Why are we huddling up during a play? Hey, idiot! Run through the hole and not into your own teammate!”

    I think I’ve come home.

  40. Pretty much up the middle pushing my players out of the way for 20 yards and a cloud of dust. The smaller players got in a couple creative plays to keep it respectable if only this or that would have happened leaving the thought of we will get them next year. Then, electric football kinda faded away for me.

  41. You think Wilson berated kids? You should have heard me with my electric football players….

    Wish I still had an electric football game…I would make things more ‘current’ by naming my star defensive end J.J. Watt. I’d probably name my kicker Cody Parkey….I would Scotch Tape him to the crossbar. Sure, it’s mean ..but it’s still better than sitting on the bench (a.k.a. ‘The Electric Chair). We would always run for two. I would borrow my little sister’s plastic dollhouse refrigerator to run a must score 2-pt conversion…. Maybe take off one of Parkey’s arms and affix it to ‘The Fridge’ ….Fridge now becomes a running back. Now we’ve got some FOOTBALL!…in a general electric sort of way. Kids are so deprived by XBox….Imaginations stolen.

    Electric football was truly a lonely child’s outlet.

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