IU adds grad transfer tight end to roster

The Indiana football team made another roster addition on Wednesday.

The Hoosiers announced that tight end Khameron Taylor will join IU as a grad transfer from South Alabama. The 6-foot-4, 270-pound native of Alachua, Fla., has one year of eligibility after earning his degree in Interdisciplinary Studies from USA earlier this month.

“We are really excited about adding Kham to our program,” Indiana coach Tom Allen said. “He brings experience to the tight end room. Other than Peyton Hendershot, we have a young group that needs some depth. Kham is a big, strong blocker with untapped potential in the pass game. He has a great combination of size, length and athleticism that immediately helps us become a better football team.”

Not only is Hendershot, a redshirt junior, the most experienced tight end on the IU roster, but he awaits a legal outcome after being charged with four misdemeanors in February — domestic battery, criminal trespass, criminal conversion, and criminal mischief — following an incident with an ex-girlfriend.

Taylor started all nine games in which he appeared in 2019 for the Jaguars and posted two catches for 18 yards with a 13-yard touchdown at Nebraska. He was named a captain for the Louisiana-Monroe game.
Overall, Taylor appeared in 24 contests with 14 starts in his South Alabama career. He caught five passes for 67 yards in 2018 and returned three kickoffs for 23 yards.

Taylor earned three letters in football and four letters in basketball at Santa Fe High School. He also finished fifth in the shot put at the state 2A outdoor track meet as a senior.

23 comments

  1. I watched this guy’s highlights from South Alabama and my conclusion is that while he won’t catch nearly as many passes as PH, he’ll function as another Offensive Tackle on running plays while being used to deceive defenses from time to time. He’s a load, but he has good hands and can catch the ball. I would not want to be a DB trying to tackle him after he gets up a head of steam. Looks like another solid pick-up for IU.

  2. I like this pickup as he has size and athletic ability especially for the size he is. He looks to be a good blocker which will help IU’s offense but he also shows good body control and hands when catching passes. I agree with coach Allen that Taylor has untapped potential as a receiver. Adding a TE with experience and age could really help the TE room.

    1. He’s being brought in to further support the offensive line, which remains a big concern of the staff. This kind of late recruiting, which is in addition to the recent signing of the tackle from out west, is proof of that. He might get a couple of balls thrown his way during the season, but his role will be as a blocker first, last and mostly everything in between.

  3. Ok. Why not. Not Rated as high school recruit. Kinda agree with Po about another run blocker that might catch a pass. However, another playing in big ten east to see how much he may play and can do that at that level of competition. Still a good pick up in IU situation.

  4. In 2 TE sets he’ll help disguise whether run/pass. Something done routinely in NFL. But he certainly is welcome support to bolster rushing needs, 3rd, 4th down, any short yardage and red zone opportunities. Always have liked a TE with size and experience.
    Now that it looks like the NCAA is leaning toward a FB season these guys could be on campus shortly and we can maybe get a closer look into what they can do.

  5. A nice little addition during the roster fine tuning part of the season. There’s one more scholarship left. If they do fill that spot, I’m assuming it’ll be another OT grad transfer or a pass rusher.

  6. I don’t think IU’s coaches are bringing in O-linemen because they’re worried about the level of talent of their O-line starters, they need to improve depth. Solid, mature and experienced players will help reduce fatigue and injuries throughout the season, and you can never have enough experienced big bodies for the offensive line.

    As far as this young man is concerned, I could care less what his star rating was coming out of High School. He played four years of HS varsity basketball and three years of FB. He’s an athlete who has developed into a football player. As I recall, Antonio Gates didn’t even play football in college, and he turned out pretty good. Not saying this young man is Antonio Gates, but a lot has changed since he was in HS. We have to trust IU’s coaches’ ability to evaluate talent and potential.

    1. At this time of year, the coaches can’t immediately address the talent deficiencies they know they have on the O line, so these late moves are about depth, as you said. These late adds are an admission that they do need to shore things up there.

  7. I’m sort of surprised we’re not getting even more athletes coming from Covid-19 hot spots. If sports is going to happen, what trade-offs are you willing to consider? Are championships more important than your health?

    I’m hearing news of the mayor of Montgomery, Alabama is considering to go back to ‘shelter in place’ due to their major hospital suddenly experiencing a big spike in Covid cases…

    What we know is that the virus is still wreaking havoc in certain clusters and factories across the U.S.
    What we also know is that sports (especially collegiate football) generates too much cash for colleges and television networks to shut it down.
    I think it’s also safe to say, there will be drastic reductions in fan participation. Can universities and states withstand lawsuits (atop already severely hit budgets) if infected fans assured a stadium’s protocols ensured safety suddenly resembles spikes of Covid akin to an auto plant or meatpacking factory outbreak?

    From a parent or athletes’ perspective, I’m starting to look to areas of the country a bit less dense in population (which includes populations congregating to the tune of numbers equaling the size of a city to follow a football game) to play football/basketball. I’m also looking at areas which have smaller stadiums …or rarely see their stadiums filled to capacity (see Memorial Stadium of Bloomington, IN). The aversion to losing the revenue generated by football will supersede commonsense safety. All risks will be downplayed and treated with aloofness. WE WANT OUR FOOTBALL!
    As an athlete, one would think a commonsense approach would be to play football where the numbers suggest less risk (stadium numbers, trends in state outbreaks now because of opening things up too soon, demographic trends, population density).
    Most conference/media exposure to least Covid/infected populations/stadium populations exposure seems to favor a place like Indiana….or Montana.

    5-star Heisman candidate running back transfers from Georgia to Montana State… ? Highest ranked high school quarterback picks Indiana over Washington State? Huge outbreak of Covid in churches across the Southeast spreads virus into 3/4 of Dabo Swinney’s Clemson football team…? Tonight on the 10 o’clock news.

  8. More succinctly (for those not willing to go the distance above)….

    I believe risk assessment in the world of pandemics favors playing college football at a place where (a) Covid hasn’t been as prevalent and (b) at a place college football has never been on the map ( though still gets some decent media ‘exposure’ because the program has somehow been allowed to play in a Power 5 conference ).
    Conclusion: Do we attribute an uptick in Allen’s recruiting (quality level of talent) because of the football outlook ….or the Covid 19 outlook? I believe there is no safer place to play college football …while still garnering decent media/conference exposure than Indiana.

    (my apologies for still not being too succinct)

  9. Virtual classroom and Virtual athletics…tuition and ticket prices…life goes on…as a balance of health, death, life evolves into
    “EVERYDAY PEOPLE .”
    Sly and the Family Stone.

  10. Looks like we have another good punter/kicker coming in from down-under. Not only can this kid punt the ball well (his longest hang time was measured at 5.8 seconds) but having grown up playing Australian Rules Football in New Zealand, he’s not afraid to tackle should he need to. He picked IU in large part because of the Business School.

  11. PO, it does look like the punter coming in will be a big addition to the special teams. This camp in Australia has found their niche in the American football game. I am a bit surprised we haven’t seen an influx of rugby players. Coach Allen has shown he wants the ST to improve and I hope we see that this season.

  12. Bloomington will feel like home for an Australian punter, mates.
    IU Football is the Australia of the BigTen! We are forever the shrimp on the BigTen barbi. It’s rather removed in Bloomington while still being great “down under” OSU, Michigan and Penn State in the standings.
    Our coach does a great sideline imitation of a kangaroo.
    The last decade we displayed some ‘down under’ success against OSU and Michigan (a.k.a. major continents), Olivia Newton John was also “getting physical” …. Her rosy cheeks were on many dorm wall posters during our brief “physical” football days too!

    thinkaboutit thinks Penix may be bigger than ‘Air Supply!’ Let’s make Memorial a ‘Crowded House!’ And let’s show those Buckeyes we do football like Olivia from down under…Once every forty years, we get PHYSICAL!

  13. You asked for it…

    Australian punters, Captain Kangaroo (Allen) and Michael ‘AIR SUPPLY’ Penix (never to be a nickname for Peyton Ramsey)! LEO!

    You know what they say about Hoosier Football…? We’re not always Australia…but we’ll ‘always trail ya.’

  14. Jeremy- When you moderated, you never stole my links. I miss my links.

    Michael ‘AIR SUPPLY’ Penix (never to be a nickname for Peyton Ramsey)!
    LEO!

  15. This young man looks like a really solid blocker that could be used to catch a pass or 2 to keep defenses honest. He’s not fast for a tight end but will be used as an athletic lineman that defenses will need to account for in the passing game. I like this pick and think we’ll see him on the field in the redzone and short yardage plays plus could be an asset as a blocker on special teams.

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