Report: JUCO CB Boyle no longer part of IU football class because of non-academic eligibility issues

Matt Weaver of Peegs.com is reporting that Shaine Boyle, a cornerback at College of the Desert in California who had verbally committed to Indiana, will not be enrolling because the staff learned his eligibility will actually run out at the end of this year.

Boyle graduated from (La.) Hahnville High School in 2007 and attended a junior college in Texas but only as a student. He attended a junior college in Mississippi in 2008 where he was supposed to play football but didn’t. He dropped out later that year when his girlfriend died of cancer. He was out of football until 2010 when he enrolled at the College of the Desert.

According to Weaver, Boyle told the IU staff that he had not begun taking classes when he left the Mississippi junior college and therefore did not begin his five-year window to play sports. However, Weaver reported that the staff later learned that information was inaccurate, and that he did begin classes and start his window, meaning that instead of having two years of eligibility remaining, he has just one, and IU decided not to keep him.

UPDATE, 8:20 p.m.: Boyle confirmed the story by phone. He said the staff told him they had been in contact with the NCAA and was hoping to get him a second year of eligibility. He said he learned two days ago that they were unsuccessful.

“It’s disappointing,” Boyle said. ┬áThat’s a dream that I always wanted to do to be able to play Division I ball. It’s not like I messed up and did something bad or got ito trouble, it came on me because of family member, my girlfriend. At the time, it was hard for me to be in school, just to be around. It’s sad that I can’t play Division I ball, but I feel bad using that for an excuse. I said that whatever the NCAA said, I was going to accept it and just going to have to go with it. I’m not going to use that as an excuse.I would’ve loved to play at Indiana and play Division I ball. Maybe I’m just not meant to play at Division I.”

Boyle said he would still have two years of eligibility if he goes to a Division II school, however, and that he will begin looking that route shortly.

 

 

2 comments

  1. I really hate the way the eligibility rules work. It’s not about competition it’s about enrollment. Once you start competition, if you step away from it you can’t be in class or you lose eligibility and, even then, you have a 5 year window.

    I am biased because I have (had) a dog in this fight.

    One of my boys wrestled for two years at the D1 level. His sophomore year he won his conference, was 4th in the nation in wins, and advanced to the third round of the NCAA Championships. For various reasons (lingering injuries, personal and, basically, burnout) he stepped away from the mat.

    Now, he’d love to come back. He wrestled two seasons. He went to school another semester but did not wrestle. If he petitions the NCAA he MIGHT get to compete for three semesters at the D2 level. He’s done at D1.

    Other than that, the Olympics or World Championships are about it. That’s kind of a high bar.

    Now, had he, for example, gone into the military, he could have competed in open tournaments (the same as college students) until he was 25 years old and then he could have come back and wrestled in college for four years.

    This is how kids like that cornerback can play for a year and lose their eligibility.

    It is a very flawed system.

  2. Chet, I agree and feel bad for your son. I hated the big kid GUY got screwed last year at IU. I wonder if the NCAA will ever review and change the eligiblity rules. Good luck to your son!!!

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