Hoosier Morning

1. HOOSIERS HQ
The bye week comes at the right time for an Indiana football team that is disappointed in the results of the first four games, Dustin writes.

The loss to Missouri was an eye opener for the Hoosiers as they prepre for Big Ten play, Andy writes.

Former Bulldog Jamie Vollmer and the IU soccer team head ‘home’ to face No. 23 Butler tonight, I wrote.

2. IT’S INDIANA
The “All Players United” movement was a new idea to IU football players, but any protest would be done as a team according to coach Kevin Wilson, David Woods of the Indianapolis Star writes.

Tom Crean says transition and help defense are a focus as Indiana starts practice, Andy Katz of ESPN.com blogs.

Defending national champion Indiana is the underdog in tonight’s soccer match with Butler, and former Hoosier Andy Bayer has signed with Nike, David Woods of the Indianapolis Star writes.

3. BIG TEN COUNTRY
The reduction in sanctions at Penn State says more about the state of the NCAA than it does the university, Dana O’Neil of ESPN.com writes.

Reducing the sanctions at Penn State sends the wrong message, one where football is still too important, Christine Brennan of USA Today writes.

4. ONE FOR THE ROAD
To celebrat the “bye” week, it’s The Cars live with “Bye Bye Love.”

4 comments

  1. Way a basketball thin. And, I’m not it is a good bsketball thing…but then, I’m just a fan.

    In soccer, it is rare to see a keeper change during a game. (Actually, it is more likely to see it when the team gets comfortably ahead than when it gets behind) and NEVER for one goal. (To give the second keeper some experience and work).

    Goals are seldom the responsibility of the goalkeeper alone, there are usually 4-5 defenders at a minimum sharing the responsibility. A more relevant question is why did the ‘opponent’ get that good a view at the goal? Why was an attacker left alone in a scoring position?

    Then, there are many goals that are just great finishing, and that does not mean strong shots. Look at really good scorers like Messi, Ronaldo, Kaka, Aguero. Most of their shots are ‘soft groundhuggers’ (not hard shots lifted two-four feet in their air where the keepers arms have an easier time getting at the ball) than a shot ‘pushed or stroked’ 3-4 feet below his arms forcing him to dive down to reach the ball (same reason a ‘bounce’ pass is so difficult to intercept in basketball).

    But- to your question…never, never is a keeper substituted just after a goal (unless there’s an injury); and very rarely is one substituted even after a not-up-to-par performance. His evaluation should be on consistency of play and when a change is made it should not be a game-to-game thing. Notice, keepers changes are not frequent at all with the higher level clubs. Spain’s greatest goalkeeper in history, it (and Real Madrid’s) all-world, World Cup champion goalkeeper and captain Iker Casillas is under a lot of criticism because of injuries and the fact that he is about 33 y.o. and having a tougher time physically. But Coach Del Bosque ignores those issues and, at Caillas’ club, Real Madrid, one of the issues against its former coach, Mourinho, that led to not being retained was his poor relationship and his threat to bench of Casillas.

    Above all, you develop their GK’s confidence and sustain it. A keeper’s performance depends on it; and the poorer the team’s defense, the more his confidence counts.,,an interesting contradiction.

    Great goalkeepers, great ones with a G, get scored on. There is even an argument that the great ones come from the poorer teams because their defenses tend to be weaker, give up more shots on goal and they get a lot many opportunities for saves than a keeper on a Barcelona or a Real Madrid or a Milan or a Bayern Munich. Since they are notice in the smaller clubs for their 8-12 saves p.g., they are bought and signed by the ‘bigger’clubs where, with better defenses they get fewer chances (to save) and lose some skill.

    TY2 is doing it perfectly. You follow your GK’s pick one and develop their consistencynand their confidence. (Your confidence in them, as a fan, does not and should not matter) And, …when and if you make a change…. it’s a CHANGE.

  2. correction: sentence should have read: ‘and NEVER, for any one goal. Changes of GK should come “to give the second keeper some experience and work only,…).

  3. “The loss to Missouri was an eye opener for the Hoosiers…..” If that is true, which I doubt, we in deed have a coaching problem. No way anyone associated with IU football should have thought that it would have taken anything less and IU’s best effort to beat Missou. How do you not understand that when you play an SEC team, you need to play big-boy football?

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