Indiana defeats Illinois, 52-35

Sophomore tailback Tevin Coleman rushed for 215 yards and two touchdowns, leading Indiana to a 52-35 win over Illinois at Memorial Stadium, snapping a three-game losing streak.

Senior tailback Stephen Houston rushed for 150 yards and two touchdowns and the Hoosiers rushed for 371 yards as a team. Sophomore quarterback Nate Sudfeld threw for 267 yards and three touchdowns, all of which went to junior wide receiver Cody Latimer. Latimer caught 11 passes for 189 yards and three touchdowns. The Hoosiers finished with 650 total yards.

Illinois lost despite 612 yards of total offense. Nathan Scheelhaase threw for 450 yards and two touchdowns and wide receiver Steve Hull caught nine passes for 224 yards and two scores.

25 comments

  1. TC has a sprained ankle…may be out next week, but should be back for OSU and Purdue.

    Tevin Coleman and Cody Lattimer are big time talents that should find themselves on NFL rosters should they stay healthy. Wouldn’t be surprised if CL tries his luck in the NFL draft next year…size, speed and good hand – 3rd round pick at worst.

    Scary to think what IU Football could accomplish if they had a better Defense.

  2. Yawn. Congrats on the win. Only partially satisfying since we wasted so many winnable games already. Now, a mind-blowing upset over OSU or UW? Exciting!

  3. D-Bone, an IU win in football is never a yawn inducing event. There have not been enough of them over the years.

  4. Freshman sprinter and weightlifter Clyde Newton in his 1st start at LB leads the D with 11 tackles. I’ll bet Flo Hardin does not start again.

  5. Good win. It’ll still take a big road upset against a powerhouse program (even though Wisconsin is a little down and OSU has had some head-scratching near-losses) before beating PU to get bowl eligible. But I’d like to point out that MN is 8-2, and Mizzou believe it or not is actually in the NC conversation, albeit a long shot. They should be a BCS bowl team, regardless. Turns out our schedule was much tougher than we all originally thought. Most of us said a low-tier bowl game was probably our ceiling to begin with, so a 5-win season while staying mostly competitive throughout is still improvement and not a complete disaster. We should. have loads of returning talent next year (NFL-calibre at all the skill positions), and there is still reason for optimism going forward. No reason to give up on CKW and our Hoosiers just yet.

  6. Punjab, I’ve been sensing the same thing about our early thoughts about having a favorable schedule. Our FBS opponents with the exception of the team to the West we just beat have a combined record of 44-15 or including Illinois 47-20. All but that team are bowl bound. I am now rethinking our favorable schedule and those advantageous 8 home games. Our D has hurt us but so has our schedule. If Minny had played Mizzou and Navy instead of their pud preseason they might very well be 6-4 and possibly derailed them toward something worse. Still good and bowl bound but not as shinning as 8-2.

  7. Agreed, HC. I think when all is said and done, we’ll look back on this season and find that we lost to a lot of good teams, and were really just one silly lateral away from calling it a pretty successful campaign… At least by Indiana football standards…

  8. If we had Minny’s record, would other programs deeper in football tradition already be working on luring Wilson out of Bloomington?

  9. Jeremy: “Yes, Harvard…I am restricting your number of sentences allowed because of the limits of your character.”

  10. I just wrapped up watching the game I recorded. The unheralded offensive line play has been remarkable. Lots of inexperience on the line has had to grow up fast and our line not only kept Sudfeld in a barcalounger, they gave Coleman and Houston lanes that you could have driven a parade through. I cannot heap enough plays on these kids.

    I still harp on the fact that our D is just not getting enough pass rush. Especially on 3rd down. I don’t really see much that is schematically problematic as much as just fundamentals of getting low, finding gaps and collapsing the pocket. I do think from an execution of blitzes standpoint, we’re trying to “hide” our blitzes too much. That requires our LBs and secondary players to overcome too much real-estate when the ball is snapped. Just step up to the gaps and let ’em rip.

    Unlike our O-line, our secondary is feeling the effects of inexperience. The two breakdowns that gave Steve Hull wide open TDs were about as bad as it gets.

    This was a great win. Watching the CKW and Litrel offense is really a lot of fun. We’ll see how the next two weeks go.

  11. (Extra credit-multiple questions)Is that ultimately the real difficulty in sustaining progress at IU football? Is Wilson willing to risk staying once the program tastes real success? And do recruits always sense that having a great coach/leader is very precarious at IU? Can that precariousness effect getting the better defensive players more than offensive players? Do defensive players and lineman have more difficulty accentuating their abilities(especially in terms of playing at the next level) on a struggling programs(below .500 teams that get very little national attention)more than offensive players at the glamor positions(QB, wide receiver, tailback, special teams/kick return artist)? Can an offensive player still garner attention from NFL scouts on a sub-par Division 1 program with more success than an in-the-trenches defensive player? Could this, along with the overall precariousness of stability at the head coaching ranks, account for an initial lag in recruiting and improvement on the defensive side of the ball in a program starting from such a bottom point as IU?

  12. Great win, and desperately needed. Podunker is correct in saying their is no such thing in yawning when IU Football wins. Win is a win. Defense still has miles to go, but like Dustin said on Scooptalk, it made a couple key stops in 4th quarter, and that’s what we need. Off to Wisconsin. Just hoping for the best is all I can really say.

  13. I’ll actually post Harvard’s other questions that apparently didn’t post. They’re reasonable.

    From Harvard
    Sunday Morning Questions:
    1. Has any former Hoosier head coach or top assistant ever left Bloomington to move to a more prestigious college football job in the last four decades? One would think it should be relatively simple to move upward when starting at the bottom.
    2. If the answer to question 1 is no, does that play into loyalty issues when head coaches are evaluating making changes at the assistant level?
    3. At the conclusion of this season, would it basically be the ‘kiss of death’ for Mallory to be fired from IU more than any other program he could have been dismissed?
    4. Does Wilson show more weakness or more strength if he concludes it’s best to let Doug Mallory go at the conclusion of the season?
    5. (a)Is it more advantageous for IU that Wilson has not turned things around at lightning speed? (b)If we were looking at a record similar to Minnesota’s this season, would he be lured out of IU before we could even capture any real momentum his positive recruiting and image change for the program?
    6. (a)If W-L records are ultimately the measure of progress in the casual observation, do the tough losses almost become a blessing in disguise? (b)Did those losses postpone any chance for Wilson to use IU as a launch pad in moving to a football program with much deeper traditions that is looking for a turnaround specialist?
    7. (Multiple parts offered as extra credit)Is that ultimately the real difficulty in sustaining progress at IU football? Is Wilson willing to risk staying once the program tastes real success? And do recruits always sense that having a great coach/leader is very precarious at IU? Can that precariousness effect getting the better defensive players more than offensive players? Do defensive players and lineman have more difficulty accentuating their abilities(especially in terms of playing at the next level) on a struggling programs(below .500 teams that get very little national attention)more than offensive players at the glamor positions(QB, wide receiver, tailback, special teams/kick return artist)? Can an offensive player still garner attention from NFL scouts on a sub-par Division 1 program with more success than an in-the-trenches defensive player? Could this, along with the overall precariousness of stability at the head coaching ranks, account for an initial lag in recruiting and improvement on the defensive side of the ball in a program starting from such a bottom point as IU?

  14. Dusty- You da man. Jeremy da ham.

    Note to Scoop bloggers: Question #7 is just a repeat of post #13(Jeremy wouldn’t let the entire post through initially)…Jeremy don’t like me.

    1. Note to Harvard: I didn’t have anything to do with those posts not coming through. We do have a spam filter here that occasionally grabs posts for reasons beyond our mortal minds. But it does prevent us all from living in Spamalot.

  15. You see, Dusty…

    No big deal was it?

    No responses for the black sheep of Scoop.

    When it’s “reasonable” coming from Harvard there are no takers anyway.

    The blasé Harvard is not the Harvard they prefer.

    They want to be stirred.

    They prefer windmills, TCDS, Going home parties, Establishment references, and illogical conclusions based on leaps of faith with no examination all the variables, the quest to learn all perimeters that go into solid formulations arguments founded in reason and reality.

    ^That’s Loaffie style(lots of white space and one sentence paragraphs..It is sort of effective).

    Off-topic: I’m completely pissed that the Bears didn’t play McCown for the entire game. That loss is on the new head coach..and a very costly loss because of going down in both contests against the Lions. Probably lost any chance at the division championship because of not going with the totally healthy and hot hand.

  16. I’m happy to win, but reason it’s “meh” is that a loss would have been their first B1G victory in 18 tries or so?

    I mean, really, there was no alternative. Anything but a win would have been just another level of embarrassment.

    Our performance and our expectations (team & fans) has to get beyond the point that a win against this level of opponent is meaningful.

    What would be meaningful is a gargantuan upset one of the next two plus a win in the Bucket game. What would have been meaningful – and less complicated – would have been one of the winnable GAMES. (NOTE: NOT EASY WINS; THAT SHOULD BE ILLINOIS WHO STILL RACKED UP 600 + YARDS AND 35 ON US.)

    Let’s not use the old tough schedule as an excuse rationalization. Let’s say we need to suck it up and find a way to get a quality win when we’re in games.

    I generally like where we’re going under Wilson, but I pray Mallory gets the axe. Go Hoosiers!

  17. H4H- in answer to question 1, Pont went to Northwestern after IU, which was probably a lateral move at the time, but he ended up being the AD there for several years. I think he was actually both the FB coach and AD for a couple of years; that probably doesn’t qualify as “a better football job,” but I would call it a promotion.

  18. It appears that Pont left IU after the ’72 season(took Hoosiers to the Rose Bowl in ’67). My question was asking for a name within the last four decades…You just barely missed the cut.

    But thanks for responding.

    Other than that remarkable ’67 season(1st place), it looked like mostly nothing spectacular during the Pont era at IU(three 9th place finishes, two 5th place, and one 6th place). Guess that brings me back to sustainability and if the 3-star and higher recruits(especially defensive guys that might not always get the attention from the NFL scouts when it comes to struggling programs)are hesitant to take the risk in fear the precariousness/willingness a successful coach to stay very long after a breakout season.

    Be interesting to see if offensive players at top football programs jump to the pros before completion of 4-year college degrees at higher rates than standout defensive players get lured away. Is it more important for a top defensive player to settle in to a program with much greater likelihood steady success than an offensive shooting star?

  19. And I’m not sure if Northwestern would have been considered a more “prestigious” football program than IU back in the late sixties/early seventies.

    I wonder if Wilson could get us to a Rose Bowl in the very near future if he would be back the following year…?

    It seems so damn difficult to even sustain basketball success at what used to be one of the most elite programs in the nation…So much competition for recruits anymore…So much more national recruiting with rankings services and technology sharing opening a plethora of ways to study and evaluate talent. Only a handful of programs can really sell to incoming recruits some sort of high probability of sustained success(or, at minimum, less risk of declining seasons and greater volatility in the win/loss columns over a short span of years).

  20. Maybe one of the strangest photos/ads I’ve had pop up on my Scoop page. Much like the Spamalot…Is this just special to my screen activity?

  21. Good questions, Harv. I’ve wondered some of the same things, and posted as much when I first started on the Scoop a year or so ago. IU doesn’t typically seem to be a destination job for head football coaches. In general, you’d think that the kinds of coaches that arrive here are either up-and-comers looking to use Bloomington as a launching pad for their careers, or castaways that couldn’t get better jobs.
    CKW could very well be the next Frank Beamer or Bill Snyder– coaches who, with no real geographic recruiting advantage or winning heritage to point to, turned perennial bottom-feeders into respectable programs and occasional contenders. And stuck with their programs after they finally tasted success. Not sure if either of those coaches had local or personal ties to their respective schools, but I’m hoping that’s what we’ve found with Wilson. I think it does help that there wasn’t some meteoric turnaround for the Hoosiers; that we are trending up, but not in such a fashion that big time programs like Arkansas or USC are trying to immediately lure CKW away. It gives him time to let his roots grow deeper. Hopefully that translates into loyalty and longevity of success.
    As for the defensive players, I think we have something special in Latham. He’s going to be a stud. But whether or not we can attract multiple difference makers on D remains to be seen. Illinois did in the nineties with Simeon Rice and Kevin Hardy. I don’t know if they were blue chip recruits at the time who just happened to choose the same mediocre program, or if ND and UM had already saturated their rosters with national recruits and the other Chicagoland targets and had no room, or if Illinois just struck gold. But there is precedent.
    We’re still going to have to settle for sloppy seconds from the Irish, Wolverines, and Buckeyes for regional talent more often than not. But it does seem we’re starting to make some in-roads in that department. I think anyone who was expecting a Baylor-esque (or Indiana basketball circa 2011) turnaround are kidding themselves. Whatever magician we bring in to accomplish that overnight makeover– unless his last name is Mallory, and that certainly doesn’t seem to be he case– would be gone to greener pastures just as soon as he got here.

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