Langford, Morgan earn All-Big Ten honors

Romeo Langford didn’t land the Big Ten Freshman of the Year award on Monday. That honor went to Michigan’s Ignas Brazdeikis.

But the Indiana guard still managed earn his share of postseason recognition, including All-Big Ten Second Team honors and a spot on the league’s All-Freshman Team.

Conference coaches voted Langford to the league’s second team, while league media placed the New Albany native on the conference’s third team, the Big Ten announced on Monday. Langford’s teammate, Juwan Morgan, also received postseason all-conference honors, landing on the media’s third team and the coaches’ list of honorable mention selections.

Langford’s 16.6 points per game lead Indiana. In all but three of the 31 games he has played for the Hoosiers this season, Langford has scored in double figures.

He had a clear case for the league’s top freshman award, averaging more points than Brazdeikis (15.0 ppg), while totaling 41 more assists, 10 more blocks and one more steal. Brazdeikis, meanwhile, was a more efficient shooter from the field (46 percent) and from beyond the arc (41 percent).

Of course, Michigan also enjoyed more team success, with the Wolverines finishing third in the league.

“Romeo, I thought, should’ve probably won Freshman of the Year, based on his numbers,” IU coach Archie Miller said. “But Michigan had a fantastic year and (Brazdeikis) was a big difference maker on a team that competed for the Big Ten title. Winning probably helped that cause.”

Langford, Brazdeikis, Illinois’ Ayo Dosunmu, Iowa’s Joe Wieskamp and Maryland’s Jalen Smith comprised the Big Ten’s All-Freshman team.

Morgan ranks ninth the in the Big Ten in scoring (15.1), fifth in rebounds (8.4), sixth in field goal percentage (55.3), seventh in blocked shots (1.5) and 11th in steals (1.2).

For his career at IU, he ranks 30th in scoring (1,298 points ), 14th in rebounding (729), fifth in field goal percentage (55.3%) and ninth in blocked shots (132). He also has 147 career assists and 101 steals.

Michigan State point guard Cassius Winston was named Big Ten Player of the year. He made the coaches first team, along with Maryland forward Bruno Fernando, Wisconsin forward Ethan Happ, Penn State forward Lamar Stevens and Purdue guard Carsen Edwards. Both Winston and Edwards were unanimous selections.

The same four of Winston, Fernando, Happ and Edwards made the media’s first team. Minnesota forward Jordan Murphy was the fifth selection.

Purdue coach Matt Painter was named coach of the year for the fourth time in his career.

Find the full selections below:

2018-19 All-Big Ten Men’s Basketball Team
As selected by Big Ten coaches

FIRST TEAM
Bruno Fernando, Maryland
CASSIUS WINSTON, Michigan State
Lamar Stevens, Penn State
CARSEN EDWARDS, Purdue
Ethan Happ, Wisconsin

SECOND TEAM
Romeo Langford, Indiana
Anthony Cowan Jr., Maryland
Ignas Brazdeikis, Michigan
Zavier Simpson, Michigan
Jordan Murphy, Minnesota

THIRD TEAM
Jordan Bohannon, Iowa
Tyler Cook, Iowa
Nick Ward, Michigan State
Amir Coffey, Minnesota
James Palmer Jr., Nebraska

HONORABLE MENTION
Ayo Dosunmu, Illinois
Juwan Morgan, Indiana
Jordan Poole, Michigan
Jon Teske, Michigan
Kenny Goins, Michigan State
Matt McQuaid, Michigan State
Dererk Pardon, Northwestern
Kaleb Wesson, Ohio State
Ryan Cline, Purdue
Geo Baker, Rutgers

ALL-FRESHMAN TEAM
Ayo Dosunmu, Illinois
Romeo Langford, Indiana
Joe Wieskamp, Iowa
Jalen Smith, Maryland
Ignas Brazdeikis, Michigan

ALL-DEFENSIVE TEAM
Bruno Fernando, Maryland
Zavier Simpson, Michigan
Matt McQuaid, Michigan State
Josh Reaves, Penn State
Nojel Eastern, Purdue

PLAYER OF THE YEAR:
Cassius Winston, Michigan State

DEFENSIVE PLAYER
OF THE YEAR:
Josh Reaves, Penn State

FRESHMAN OF THE YEAR:
Ignas Brazdeikis, Michigan

SIXTH PLAYER OF THE YEAR:
Xavier Tillman, Michigan State

COACH OF THE YEAR:
Matt Painter, Purdue

2018-19 All-Big Ten Men’s Basketball Team
As selected by Media Voting Panel

FIRST TEAM
Bruno Fernando, Maryland
CASSIUS WINSTON, Michigan State
Jordan Murphy, Minnesota
CARSEN EDWARDS, Purdue
Ethan Happ, Wisconsin

SECOND TEAM
Tyler Cook, Iowa
Anthony Cowan Jr., Maryland
Ignas Brazdeikis, Michigan
Zavier Simpson, Michigan
Lamar Stevens, Penn State

THIRD TEAM
Romeo Langford, Indiana
Juwan Morgan, Indiana
Nick Ward, Michigan State
Amir Coffey, Minnesota
James Palmer Jr., Nebraska

HONORABLE MENTION
Ayo Dosunmu, Illinois
Trent Frazier, Illinois
Jordan Bohannon, Iowa
Luka Garza, Iowa
Charles Matthews, Michigan
Jordan Poole, Michigan
Jon Teske, Michigan
Kenny Goins, Michigan State
Matt McQuaid, Michigan State
Vic Law, Northwestern
Dererk Pardon, Northwestern
Kaleb Wesson, Ohio State
Josh Reaves, Penn State
Ryan Cline, Purdue
Matt Haarms, Purdue
Geo Baker, Rutgers
Eugene Omoruyi, Rutgers
D’Mitrik Trice, Wisconsin

PLAYER OF THE YEAR:
Cassius Winston, Michigan State

FRESHMAN OF THE YEAR:
Ignas Brazdeikis, Michigan

COACH OF THE YEAR:
Matt Painter, Purdue

2018-19 Big Ten Sportsmanship Award Honorees
Aaron Jordan, Illinois
Zach McRoberts, Indiana
Nicholas Baer, Iowa
Bruno Fernando, Maryland
Isaiah Livers, Michigan
Cassius Winston, Michigan State
Jordan Murphy, Minnesota
Isaiah Roby, Nebraska
Dererk Pardon, Northwestern
Joey Lane, Ohio State
Deivis Zemgulis, Penn State
Grady Eifert, Purdue
Shaquille Doorson, Rutgers
Khalil Iverson, Wisconsin

Unanimous selections IN ALL CAPS

54 comments

  1. Didn’t get selected to be Big Ten Freshman of the Year or even First or Second Team All Big Ten, but Romeo is supposed to be a top-5 pick in the upcoming NBA Draft? I guess I just don’t understand how the NBA evaluates talent.

    Congrats to both of these fine young men. Hopefully next year, there will be three IU players on these lists.

    1. Po,
      The NBA talent scouts recognize the injury effect on Romeo’s game this year whether those voting for conference honors do or not. Tell me which one of those honored will go before Romeo in the draft? The answer is probably none, which tells you what the NBA scouts think of the popularity polls normally masquerading as all star lists. I mean what’s the historical track record of success in the NFL of Heisman winners?

      If the the team had been healthy all year and played that way, both Romeo and Juwan would be at the top of everyone’s lists. These selections say more about the 17-14 record than they do about Romeo’s NBA potential.

    2. That is not at all unusual. Lottery picks frequently are not named to conference first team lists. Conversely, first team all conference players often have no shot whatsoever at the pros.

      It is a different set of criteria. Troy Williams is in the NBA (last I heard). Plenty of guys who finished ahead of him on All B1G lists are in management training programs somewhere.

      1. Lottery picks frequently are not named to conference first team lists.

        Huh?

        2012-13 ALL-BIG TEN MEN’S BASKETBALL TEAMS

        FIRST TEAM (coaches)
        VICTOR OLADIPO, INDIANA
        Cody Zeller, Indiana
        TREY BURKE, MICHIGAN
        Tim Hardaway Jr., Michigan
        Deshaun Thomas, Ohio State

        FIRST TEAM (media)
        VICTOR OLADIPO, INDIANA
        CODY ZELLER, INDIANA
        TREY BURKE, MICHIGAN
        Aaron Craft, Ohio State
        DESHAUN THOMAS, OHIO STATE

        THIRD TEAM
        Christian Watford, Indiana

        DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR Victor Oladipo, Indiana
        SIXTH MAN OF THE YEAR Will Sheehey, Indiana
        ALL-FRESHMAN TEAM Yogi Ferrell, Indiana

        *Mitch McGary never made a list…nor made it to the NBA. He merely led his Michigan team to a Final Four and had one of the most incredible NCAA tournaments(as a freshman) in the history of March Madness.

        Lists, lottery pick, projections, popularity votes, pundits….? They don’t necessarily get you to a Final Four. You gotta want it. You gotta have ‘it factor’ when it matters. And one other tiny thing….You’ve gotta have coaching.

        Now want it, Hoosiers! I honestly think if we get into the tournament, we have a fabulous chance at making a very memorable run. Nearly every guy on our roster(including sixth and seventh man) is playing their best ball of the season. All are peaking at the right time.

        1. I mentioned Troy. He is a couple even better examples from the same year.

          Thomas Bryant was 3rd team and he was the 42nd overall pick.

          O.G. Anunoby was shut out of the awards and he was the 23rd overall pick.

          Plenty of names above them you might have forgotten.

          1. Lottery picks frequently are not named to conference first team lists.

            But you said lottery picks…Two of our most famous recent lottery picks were All-Big Ten First Team (coaches and media).

            Of course, the debate can continue to as if either really should have been lottery picks. Zeller is the luckiest draft pick on earth. Oladipo finally found a fit where he can be the celebrity on a, otherwise, rather ‘pedestrian’ team.

            Big shout out to my man, Bill Coen….After a heartbreaking defeat last season in their conference title game, Northeastern comes through tonight and is back in the Big Dance.

            And shout out to Kelvin Sampson as well.

            Wish both these excellent coaches great things…though Kelvin’s team is far more loaded.

            Teams to watch: Northeastern, Georgetown, Houston and HOOSIERS! Of course, Northeastern is about a 1000 to 1 shot to get beyond the first round. Love all the aforementioned because they are all extremely well coached and share the ball.

          2. Wish Troy the best…but if I didn’t have such a full head of hair, I’d be bald from pulling it all out watching him on the Hoosiers. He had absolutely no b-ball IQ and was a turnover wreck.

            Wonderful potential talent needing far more polish than any top program(Duke, Kansas, Michigan, Villanova, Virginia, etc) would ever bother. Teams truly wanting to be in the hunt for titles simply can’t risk that much on raw phenoms as rough as those “Mr. Galileo” Pop-up Book coach took chances at our expense.

            Oladipo was coming around just in time to leave Indiana…But most of Crean’s experiments left nowhere near a refined college basketball talent. But as many have said, the draft is heavily weighted in potential. You don’t have to be refined…You need to be a highlight reel and have the athleticism that may eventually translate to future success.

  2. One can read a lot into Archie’s quote. The voters did IU a favor with their “best of” lists. Let’s see if these two & their teammates are offended by it.

  3. I think Romeo was the best freshman in the Big Ten this year. I also think that he will not be drafted in the top five in the upcoming NBA Draft. But as I said, I know squat about the NBA and have even less interest in a league of “Sports Entertainers.”

  4. Romeo is currently hanging around anywhere from #9 to #12 on a few of the mock drafts I checked out.

    Not that it really matters….20 million? 30 million? 40 million? Most of us would take it.

  5. Theory: When you have a great coach, nobody makes the list(other coaches are jealous of a our new great coach …and thus react by dissing our talent).
    When you have a crappy coach, everybody makes the list (competing coaches want to act like Indiana is on the rise/uptick because they want us hung with the crappy coach).

    e.g. Remember how Izzo was dissing Justin Smith….? That’s not what’s really bothering him. What really has him in a funk is knowing we no longer have a pushover for a coach. He’s being out-coached….and he’s witnessing an Indiana coach who will soon threaten to finally return Indiana to a place that does not involve silent snickering/mockery for being lost on the court.

  6. Sort of off-topic…but are any of you watching the news today? Wow…just..wow.

    Headline: TV stars and coaches charged in college bribery scheme

    In one case, a former USC women’s soccer coach and the consultant allegedly worked together in 2017 to help a client’s child get into Yale in exchange for $1.2 million from the family. A false athletic profile created for the student said she played competitive soccer and had been on China’s junior national development team.

    The profile was sent to the coach of the Yale women’s soccer team and the student was accepted. Prosecutors said the Yale coach, Rudolph Meredith, received $400,000 from the consulting company after the student was accepted, even though he knew the student did not play competitive soccer.

    https://www.apnews.com/2450688f9e67435c8590e59a1b0e5b47

    1. Yeah, I paid a million to get my daughter into Cornell.

      Seriously, I was pissed. My daughter was a tremendous student but I have no doubt that her athleticism played a role in her acceptance. When I heard about coaches faking accomplishments it hit a nerve.

  7. Yes goes along with my thoughts. We only hear about ones that are caught or highly suspicious of or when they are caught. How about those who are good enough not to get caught or things that are not even heard of (out of sight out of mind). How long does it take for an investigation to catch someone? Investor embezzling and money fraud might take several years of investigation and many financial lives ruined before a sentence comes down. Sometimes there are very stiff sentences and other times lighter sentences. Our educational system is no different, especially nowadays. Lori Loughlin says it all for me regarding how wide spread the broad term of corruption is.

    1. As my wife said, they (the parents) are probably shocked that they did something wrong. They have a ton of money and they are used to getting everything they want.

      If something isn’t going they way you want you give someone some money to fix that.

  8. They’ll get light sentences like Manafort ….and be out with ‘time well served’ before you can blink. It’s really hard not to be cynical anymore. The level of greed and thievery robbing so many from equal access, career aspirations and a fair playing ground is America rotting upon itself.

    Trillions of dollars in student loan debt crushing so many Americans…and then you hear of this sort of sh___? Lock them up! Lock them up! Lock them up!

    How do we know if college player ranking systems aren’t just as corrupted?

      1. Clearly Manafort frauded and stole from us, the system. But he has already been sentenced for 47 months. He has time served of 9 months in the books. Today he could be sentenced up to 10 years more. Serving consecutive or concurrent to the original 47. Regardless he is going to lose a big chunk of his life to incarceration and rightfully so. He has lost wealth, career and a free way of life. I’d say the system worked at least on the backside of his crimes.

        1. Totally agree. The system did work and it was quite tempered. He was treated generously but may still die in prison.

          It is reassuring to see that people in his demographic can sometimes be held accountable. That is often not the case.

          At the end of the day he may simply be a piece of the puzzle. We are living in interesting times.

          1. Treated far too generously…..and I hope he does die in prison. I have zero sympathy for financial criminals. These criminals steal pension funds and retirement funds via tax fraud and other shemes from honest people who have put in a lifetime of hard work and careful management of every dime they try to save. He should never see the light of day again. He spit in the face of prosecutors. He lied to protect more criminals. He showed zero remorse and remained arrogant until the final day he knew he was facing a judge not the hip pocket of the country club of criminals.
            Throw away the key. If only we could prosecute the thousands of financial criminals like him on a daily basis.

          2. I totally agree.

            A black kid shoplifts some food and they get 7 years.

            A white guy with an MBA steals $25 million from retirees bankrupting them and they pay a fine and have their license suspended. I lived in Denver when Neal Bush and Silverado Savings stole the retirement funds from hundreds of senior citizens.

            He never served a day.

          3. At least the system worked and Manafort didn’t get to walk as so many of those pieces of $hit do.

            Happy the Manhattan DA made an appearance. Manafort will hopefully die in prison.

  9. Yeah…like the loophole that kept UNC’s ‘ghost classes’ perfectly legal on athletes’ official academic transcripts for two decades…lol.

    And Dick Vitale has the nerve tonight to say a 14 or 15 loss team doesn’t deserve to be in the tournament? None of these Establishment hypocrites can get themselves to identify the true “cheats” beating the system year after year…after year. Donors..and greed. Donors and greed. UNC doesn’t deserve to be in a tournament EVER!

  10. Wow just wow….reading the comments section underneath article about this, many comments are pretty much oh hum business as usual.
    These are high profile examples.
    Think about all the corruption that goes on for lesser money, less famous, smaller level. Really, who knows where it begins and ends in the sports world. The fact is there is no beginning and ending.
    Then, of course be an advocate seeking donations.
    Be a political candidate seeking donations.
    Religious figures, fakes, tv ministries, radio ministries, and others seeking donations to spread the word.
    There is always talk of honesty, integrity, claims, research (crooked and corrupt research) but corruption corruption corruption

  11. If I was a wealthy person’s kid I would ask my mom and dad just give me $500, 000. I will go to IVY TECH preferably on the beach. (Head games…why a specific college like that was the only one)
    While riding my bicycle through Naples Florida I was really curious how the people that drove Bentleys etc and lived in the museum type homes ( some have other homes as well); I was interested in their story whatever that story was. Of course very seldom seen the people in the homes. There are several places around the coastal US including California that much wealth rests and throughout interior US and even world.
    Then there are the millions upon millions paid to CEOs including to a lesser extent those underneath them retiring with ungodly retirement or buy out packages. How much is one man worth? Not near as much as they get, not even close no matter what they have supposedly done in the system of scam, corruption, fraud, etc in the system of good old boys networking. The mafia is just more appropriate, legal with proper self righteousness etiquette and much more on a massive scale now as the small change it use to be.

  12. I’m going to avoid making political comments or anything that touches on class warfare, but these wealthy people who game/defraud the system to get their kids into universities that they don’t otherwise qualify for are just stupid. Such behavior is so obviously bad for the kids, certainly increasing the chance that they will turn out to be worthless adults, miserable and failures. Creating a sense of entitlement for your kids damages them, deprives them of a sense of accomplishment, which I believe is invaluable to every young person, and makes them “soft.” Sooner or later the real world catches up to those kids and they’re not prepared to deal with it. No wonder so many of them become depressed! Just think how these kids feel now that the illegal actions of their parents have been revealed in public! Think they’re feeling good about themselves?

    My Dad came from nothing, fought in WWII, went to college on the GI Bill and eventually established a successful construction business. I worked part time as a laborer for his company from age 12 until I graduated from IU. He made sure that I was always assigned the worst, most difficult and dirtiest tasks available and always held me to higher performance standards than any of his other laborers. My co-workers always thought I was in his dog house and actually expressed sympathy for me. I resented his treatment for many years, but later came to understand that he had done me a great favor. In relative terms, no boss I’ve had since has come close to being as tough or demanding, and no tasks I’ve ever been required to perform have been as difficult. He had the money to put me through college but refused to do so. I had to pay my own way and take out student loans for the difference. After graduating in four years and securing a job before leaving campus, Dad’s “graduation gift” was to pay off my student loans. After my shock dissipated, I came to understand that paying off my student loans had been the least of his gifts to me, and to this day I’m grateful.

    1. You know, I pumped gas at the College Mall Shell station car wash for a couple years before I got a job at Bloomington hospital. I loved both jobs.

      I graduated with no debt. That is unthinkable now. Working at a car wash and a hospital and I paid for my college education.

      Things are not right today.

  13. Weren’t our parents so damn lucky to not have these distractions? I can’t help but ponder where it all will take us. Who ever needs to even step outside anymore(other than a great outdoorsman like Chet)….? Everything is at our fingertips. Food delivered to our door. Fantasy, gambling, sports…and all things too tempting to mention of sorts. Who will be our builders? Who will get their hands dirty? Who will touch the grass enough to care it grows in the plains? I ponder where it all will take us. The shade under a tree on a hot summer’s day? Can it be found on these keyboard in which I pound away? These keys fall to my hammering but nothing is ever built …..No sun is absorbed upon my shoulders. No warm waters I’ve sunk my toes. Maybe this is how the earth shall reclaim itself as we lock ourselves into the depths of forever projecting without introspecting. Who will build things? Who will sail the seas? I’m not smart enough to have built this massive highway I stay parked ….and I’m surely not Socrates.

  14. I’ll take the $500,000 (realizing 500,000 grand is not that much) for IVY TECH on the beach and roll the dice and play percentages.
    Chelsey Clinton
    Trump family
    Bush family
    All political families
    All or most pro athletic team families
    College athletic coaches families
    Movie and Entertainment families
    Media families
    CEO and Executive families

    Just to give a few examples for those who aren’t smart enough or live blindly with their head in the sand.

    Yes, $500,000 grand doesn’t sound bad. Just need to find IVY TECH on the beach.
    Upon graduation maybe parents can give me a $1,000,000 to get my business going. (maybe from their petty cash donations political office candidancy) all for my role in the party….or just because they have the money.
    Yes, those odds sound pretty good and I would take those odds and let others (willing to delegate) do the so called hard honest work/way. I think I could be very career happy with that

    An example: when Evan Bayh was governor of Indiana his pretty law degree wife and mother set on 5 or 6 health insurance boards at the tune of about $900,000 per year.

    Example: Ex Indiana Governor Daniels does Purdue a favor as the board which some were appointed or chosen by him and his gang upon retiring from governor becomes Purdue president for a base of about $550,000 base salary per year plus incentives and perks that go with it. Serving the community.
    Those who claim to play or be involved for the love of the game in sports…How much would all those that have made big money off sports (and yes with corrupt rules and laws rules that allow it) still be involved and love them if the big money was gone? Really gone?

  15. Basketball question: Does anyone still think Sean Miller is innocent of cheating? Sure sounded like he gave a farewell speech to the Arizona fans. We’re gonna know a lot more by the end of April. Isn’t it convenient how all of this nastiness isn’t going to be fully addressed until after March Madness?

    But when it’s a 3-way calling scandal, we drop that ‘wrecking’ bombshell just days before the NCAA tournament is to begin.

  16. Depends on how guilty is defined.
    Johnny Wooden kind of guilty.
    Sure I can set up a meeting but don’t want to know nothin. Leave me out of it.
    Head turned, don’t think, don’t ponder, don’t ask, don’t worry be happy, don’t no kind of innocence. Vindicated.
    Inside himself what he thinks and feels; sure he is guilty.

      1. Chet you’re so right. A NM type gig would be the ideal for Alford. To equate it to B1G a Nebraska/PSU program; ACC a NCSt/Clemson; or try this on for size, Big East Butler Bulldogs. That 1 I think is a pretty good fit. Jordan looks to be on a bigger stage(BE)than he can handle and recruiting has certainly diminished. Both of which Alford would handle more successfully. I guess we’ll set back and see.

  17. How major? Alford’s contract buyout etc seems excellent. Pay was excellent. Except for minor colleges pretty all near major college contracts pay well. Just make sure the buyout is good also. My guess would be not anywhere close to elite major basketball school but a mid major to major college yes. Does Alford want to still coach? At least immediately? To what extent? He definitely could be assistant or in another capacity?

  18. Integrity and university lifestyles of rich and famous.

    Lori Laughlin daughter on USC official’s yacht as her mom charged with paying for daughter’s admission to USC.
    (Probably of course discussing her being a member of crew team).
    This is after daughter trying to be cool and putting on social media… I don’t know how much I will attend college. I just want game day experience and to party.

  19. Unrelate,d but I just saw that the third case of mumps has been reported at IU.

    Personally, I think if you are stupid enough to leave your kids unvaccinated and cause someone else to contract the disease you should be held accountable, if not criminally then in civil court.

    This needs to stop.

  20. As reinforced by Georgia’s hiring of Crean, “one man’s trash (fired coach) is another man’s treasure (winning coach).” Alford is still getting paid a lot of money by UCLA. He should not be in any hurry to forfeit those severance payments. I think he’ll take some time off, do some soul searching, take a few long 5-star vacations, get his mind right, and then come back at another program where he gets along with the AD, and where fans’ expectations are reasonable. UCLA’s AD and fan base are delusional. They still think they can return UCLA to elite basketball status. Hell, they can’t even win Championships in the weakest Power-5 conference in the country. UCLA’s student body are no longer passionate about basketball (demographics is destiny), the band-wagon basketball fans in LA are invested in the Lakers and Clippers, UCLA’s basketball facilities are no longer world class, UCLA’s admission standards, while not as rigorous as Stanford or ND, present a challenge to recruiting. UCLA only became an elite basketball school in the first place by running the most corrupt college athletic program in history. Before his players began getting paid big bucks, Wooden was a mediocre college coach. It was a mistake for Alford to take the job in the first place, so he should now feel relieved, take some time off, hit the reset button and go back to coaching at a school where producing winning seasons and conference championships is appreciated.

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